Select

Selecting subsets of data

Overview

Select provides:

  1. An API for taking slices (elements selected by the Cartesian product of vectors of subscripts for each axis) of array-like objects. The most important function is select. Unless you want to define additional methods for select, this is pretty much all you need from this library. See the API reference for additional details.
  2. An extensible DSL for selecting a subset of valid subscripts. This is useful if, for example, you want to resolve column names in a data frame in your implementation of select.
  3. A set of utility functions for traversing selections in array-like objects.

It combines the functionality of dplyr’s slice and select methods.

Basic Usage

The most frequently used form is:

(select object selection1 selection2 ...)

where each selection specifies a set of subscripts along the corresponding axis. The selection specifications are found below.

Selection Specifiers

Selecting Single Values

A non-negative integer selects the corresponding index, while a negative integer selects an index counting backwards from the last index. For example:

(select #(0 1 2 3) 1)                  ; => 1
(select #(0 1 2 3) -2)                 ; => 2

These are called singleton slices. Each singleton slice drops the dimension: vectors become atoms, matrices become vectors, etc.

Selecting Ranges

(range start end) selects subscripts i where start <= i < end. When end is nil, the last index is included (cf. subseq). Each boundary is resolved according to the other rules, if applicable, so you can use negative integers:

(select #(0 1 2 3) (range 1 3))         ; => #(1 2)
(select #(0 1 2 3) (range 1 -1))        ; => #(1 2)

Selecting All Subscripts

t selects all subscripts:

(select #2A((0 1 2)
	        (3 4 5))
	 t 1)                           ; => #(1 4)

Selecting w/ Sequences

Sequences can be used to make specific selections from the object. For example:

(select #(0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
	(vector (range 1 3) 6 (range -2 -1))) ; => #(1 2 3 6 8 9)

(select #(0 1 2) '(2 2 1 0 0))                ; => #(2 2 1 0 0)

Masks

Bit Vectors

Bit vectors can be used to select elements of arrays and sequences as well:

(select #(0 1 2 3 4) #*00110)          ; => #(2 3)

Which

which returns an index of the positions in SEQUENCE which satisfy PREDICATE.

(defparameter data
  #(12 127 28 42 39 113 42 18 44 118 44 37 113 124 37 48 127 36 29 31 125
   139 131 115 105 132 104 123 35 113 122 42 117 119 58 109 23 105 63 27
   44 105 99 41 128 121 116 125 32 61 37 127 29 113 121 58 114 126 53 114
   96 25 109 7 31 141 46 13 27 43 117 116 27 7 68 40 31 115 124 42 128 146
   52 71 118 117 38 27 106 33 117 116 111 40 119 47 105 57 122 109 124
   115 43 120 43 27 27 18 28 48 125 107 114 34 133 45 120 30 127 31 116))
(which data :predicate #'evenp)
; #(0 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 15 17 25 26 30 31 34 40 44 46 48 55 56 57 59 60 66 71 74
;  75 78 79 80 81 82 84 86 88 91 93 98 100 103 107 108 109 112 113 116 117 120)

Extensions

The previous section describes the core functionality. The semantics can be extended. The extensions in this section are provided by the library and prove useful in practice. Their implementation provide good examples of extending the library.

including is convenient if you want the selection to include the end of the range:

(select #(0 1 2 3) (including 1 2))
				    ; => #(1 2), cf. (select ... (range 1 3))

nodrop is useful if you do not want to drop dimensions:

(select #(0 1 2 3) (nodrop 2))
			; => #(2), cf. (select ... (range 2 3))

All of these are trivial to implement. If there is something you are missing, you can easily extend select. Pull request are welcome.

(ref) is a version of (select) that always returns a single element, so it can only be used with singleton slices.

Select Semantics

Arguments of select, except the first one, are meant to be resolved using canonical-representation, in the select-dev package. If you want to extend select, you should define methods for canonical-representation. See the source code for the best examples. Below is a simple example that extends the semantics with ordinal numbers.

(defmacro define-ordinal-selection (number)
  (check-type number (integer 0))
  `(defmethod select-dev:canonical-representation
       ((axis integer) (select (eql ',(intern (format nil \"~:@@(~:r~)\" number)))))
     (assert (< ,number axis))
     (select-dev:canonical-singleton ,number)))

(define-ordinal-selection 1)
(define-ordinal-selection 2)
(define-ordinal-selection 3)

(select #(0 1 2 3 4 5) (range 'first 'third)) ; => #(1 2)

Note the following:

  • The value returned by canonical-representation needs to be constructed using canonical-singleton, canonical-range, or canonical-sequence. You should not use the internal representation directly as it is subject to change.
  • You can assume that axis is an integer; this is the default. An object may define a more complex mapping (such as, for example, named rows & columns), but unless a method specialized to that is found, canonical-representation will just query its dimension (with axis-dimension) and try to find a method that works on integers.
  • You need to make sure that the subscript is valid, hence the assertion.

Last modified 09 June 2021: Miscellanous updates (afaabc3)