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System Manuals

Manuals for Lisp-Stat systems

This section describes the core APIs and systems that comprise Lisp-Stat. These APIs include both the high level functionality described elsewhere, as well as lower level APIs that they are built on. This section will be of interest to ‘power users’ and developers who wish to extend Lisp-Stat, or build modules of their own.

1 - Array Operations

Manipulating sample data as arrays

Overview

The array-operations system contains a collection of functions and macros for manipulating Common Lisp arrays and performing numerical calculations with them.

Array-operations is a ‘generic’ way of operating on array like data structures. Several aops functions have been implemented for data-frame. For those that haven’t, you can transform arrays to data frames using the df:matrix-df function, and a data-frame to an array using df:as-array. This make it convenient to work with the data sets using either system.

Quick look

Arrays can be created with numbers from a statistical distribution:

(rand '(2 2)) ; => #2A((0.62944734 0.2709539) (0.81158376 0.6700171))

in linear ranges:

(linspace 1 10 7) ; => #(1 5/2 4 11/2 7 17/2 10)

or generated using a function, optionally given index position

(generate #'identity '(2 3) :position) ; => #2A((0 1 2) (3 4 5))

They can also be transformed and manipulated:

(defparameter A #2A((1 2)
                    (3 4)))
(defparameter B #2A((2 3)
                    (4 5)))

;; split along any dimension
(split A 1)  ; => #(#(1 2) #(3 4))

;; stack along any dimension
(stack 1 A B) ; => #2A((1 2 2 3)
              ;        (3 4 4 5))

;; element-wise function map
(each #'+ #(0 1 2) #(2 3 5)) ; => #(2 4 7)

;; element-wise expressions
(vectorize (A B) (* A (sqrt B))) ; => #2A((1.4142135 3.4641016)
                                 ;        (6.0       8.944272))

;; index operations e.g. matrix-matrix multiply:
(each-index (i j)
  (sum-index k
    (* (aref A i k) (aref B k j)))) ; => #2A((10 13)
	                                ;        (22 29))

Array shorthand

The library defines the following short function names that are synonyms for Common Lisp operations:

array-operations Common Lisp
size array-total-size
rank array-rank
dim array-dimension
dims array-dimensions
nrow number of rows in matrix
ncol number of columns in matrix

The array-operations package has the nickname aops, so you can use, for example, (aops:size my-array) without use‘ing the package.

Displaced arrays

According to the Common Lisp specification, a displaced array is:

An array which has no storage of its own, but which is instead indirected to the storage of another array, called its target, at a specified offset, in such a way that any attempt to access the displaced array implicitly references the target array.

Displaced arrays are one of the niftiest features of Common Lisp. When an array is displaced to another array, it shares structure with (part of) that array. The two arrays do not need to have the same dimensions, in fact, the dimensions do not be related at all as long as the displaced array fits inside the original one. The row-major index of the former in the latter is called the offset of the displacement.

displace

Displaced arrays are usually constructed using make-array, but this library also provides displace for that purpose:

(defparameter *a* #2A((1 2 3)
                      (4 5 6)))
(aops:displace *a* 2 1) ; => #(2 3)

Here’s an example of using displace to implement a sliding window over some set of values, say perhaps a time-series of stock prices:

(defparameter stocks (aops:linspace 1 100 100))
(loop for i from 0 to (- (length stocks) 20)
      do (format t "~A~%" (aops:displace stocks 20 i)))
;#(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20)
;#(2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21)
;#(3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22)

flatten

flatten displaces to a row-major array:

(aops:flatten *a*) ; => #(1 2 3 4 5 6)

split

The real fun starts with split, which splits off sub-arrays nested within a given axis:

(aops:split *a* 1) ; => #(#(1 2 3) #(4 5 6))
(defparameter *b* #3A(((0 1) (2 3))
                      ((4 5) (6 7))))
(aops:split *b* 0) ; => #3A(((0 1) (2 3)) ((4 5) (6 7)))
(aops:split *b* 1) ; => #(#2A((0 1) (2 3)) #2A((4 5) (6 7)))
(aops:split *b* 2) ; => #2A((#(0 1) #(2 3)) (#(4 5) #(6 7)))
(aops:split *b* 3) ; => #3A(((0 1) (2 3)) ((4 5) (6 7)))

Note how splitting at 0 and the rank of the array returns the array itself.

sub

Now consider sub, which returns a specific array, composed of the elements that would start with given subscripts:

(aops:sub *b* 0) ; => #2A((0 1)
                 ;        (2 3))
(aops:sub *b* 0 1) ; => #(2 3)
(aops:sub *b* 0 1 0) ; => 2

In the case of vectors, sub works like aref:

(aops:sub #(1 2 3 4 5) 1) ; => 2

There is also a (setf sub) function.

partition

partition returns a consecutive chunk of an array separated along its first subscript:

(aops:partition #2A((0 1)
                    (2 3)
                    (4 5)
                    (6 7)
                    (8 9))
              1 3) ; => #2A((2 3)
			       ;        (4 5))

and also has a (setf partition) pair.

combine

combine is the opposite of split:

(aops:combine #(#(0 1) #(2 3))) ; => #2A((0 1)
                                ;        (2 3))

subvec

subvec returns a displaced subvector:

(aops:subvec #(0 1 2 3 4) 2 4) ; => #(2 3)

There is also a (setf subvec) function, which is like (setf subseq) except for demanding matching lengths.

reshape

Finally, reshape can be used to displace arrays into a different shape:

(aops:reshape #2A((1 2 3)
                  (4 5 6)) '(3 2))
; => #2A((1 2)
;        (3 4)
;        (5 6))

You can use t for one of the dimensions, to be filled in automatically:

(aops:reshape *b* '(1 t)) ; => #2A((0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7))

reshape-col and reshape-row reshape your array into a column or row matrix, respectively:

(defparameter *a* #2A((0 1)
                      (2 3)
					  (4 5)))
(aops:reshape-row *a*) ;=> #2A((0 1 2 3 4 5))
(aops:reshape-col *a*) ;=> #2A((0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5))

Specifying dimensions

Functions in the library accept the following in place of dimensions:

  • a list of dimensions (as for make-array),
  • a positive integer, which is used as a single-element list,
  • another array, the dimensions of which are used.

The last one allows you to specify dimensions with other arrays. For example, to reshape an array a1 to look like a2, you can use

(aops:reshape a1 a2)

instead of the longer form

(aops:reshape a1 (aops:dims a2))

Creation & transformation

When the resulting element type cannot be inferred, functions that create and transform arrays are provided in pairs; one of these will allow you to specify the array-element-type of the result, while the other assumes it is t. The former ends with a *, and the element-type is always its first argument. Examples are given for the versions without *; use the other when you are optimizing your code and you are sure you can constrain to a given element-type.

Element traversal order of these functions is unspecified. The reason for this is that the library may use parallel code in the future, so it is unsafe to rely on a particular element traversal order.

The following functions all make a new array, taking the dimensions as input. The version ending in * also takes the array type as first argument. There are also versions ending in ! which do not make a new array, but take an array as first argument, which is modified and returned.

Function Description
zeros Filled with zeros
ones Filled with ones
rand Filled with uniformly distributed random numbers between 0 and 1
randn Normally distributed with mean 0 and standard deviation 1
linspace Evenly spaced numbers in given range

For example:

(aops:rand '(2 2))
; => #2A((0.6686077 0.59425664)
;        (0.7987722 0.6930506))

(aops:rand* 'single-float '(2 2))
; => #2A((0.39332366 0.5557821)
;        (0.48831415 0.10924244))

(let ((a (make-array '(2 2) :element-type 'double-float)))
  ;; Modify array A, filling with random numbers
  (aops:rand! a))
  ; => #2A((0.6324615478515625d0 0.4636608362197876d0)
  ;        (0.4145939350128174d0 0.5124958753585815d0))
(linspace 0 4 5)   ;=> #(0 1 2 3 4)
(linspace 1 3 5)   ;=> #(0 1/2 1 3/2 2)
(linspace 0 4d0 3) ;=> #(0.0d0 2.0d0 4.0d0)

generate

generate (and generate*) allow you to generate arrays using functions. The function signatures are:

generate* (element-type function dimensions &optional arguments)
generate (function dimensions &optional arguments)

Where arguments are passed to function. Possible arguments are:

  • no arguments, when ARGUMENTS is nil
  • the position (= row major index), when ARGUMENTS is :POSITION
  • a list of subscripts, when ARGUMENTS is :SUBSCRIPTS
  • both when ARGUMENTS is :POSITION-AND-SUBSCRIPTS
(aops:generate (lambda () (random 10)) 3) ; => #(6 9 5)

(aops:generate #'identity '(2 3) :position) ; => #2A((0 1 2)
                                            ;        (3 4 5))

(aops:generate #'identity '(2 2) :subscripts)
; => #2A(((0 0) (0 1))
;        ((1 0) (1 1)))

(aops:generate #'cons '(2 2) :position-and-subscripts)
; => #2A(((0 0 0) (1 0 1))
;        ((2 1 0) (3 1 1)))

permute

permute can permute subscripts (you can also invert, complement, and complete permutations, look at the docstring and the unit tests). Transposing is a special case of permute:

(defparameter *a* #2A((1 2 3)
                      (4 5 6)))
(aops:permute '(0 1) *a*) ; => #2A((1 2 3)
                          ;        (4 5 6))
(aops:permute '(1 0) *a*) ; => #2A((1 4)
                          ;        (2 5)
						  ;        (3 6))

each

each applies a function to its one dimensional array arguments elementwise. It essentially is an element-wise function map on each of the vectors:

(aops:each #'+ #(0 1 2)
               #(2 3 5)
			   #(1 1 1)
; => #(3 5 8)

vectorize

vectorize is a macro which performs elementwise operations

(defparameter a #(1 2 3 4))
(aops:vectorize (a) (* 2 a)) ; => #(2 4 6 8)

(defparameter b #(2 3 4 5))
(aops:vectorize (a b) (* a (sin b)))
; => #(0.9092974 0.28224 -2.2704074 -3.8356972)

There is also a version vectorize* which takes a type argument for the resulting array, and a version vectorize! which sets elements in a given array.

margin

The semantics of margin are more difficult to explain, so perhaps an example will be more useful. Suppose that you want to calculate column sums in a matrix. You could permute (transpose) the matrix, split its sub-arrays at rank one (so you get a vector for each row), and apply the function that calculates the sum. margin automates that for you:

(aops:margin (lambda (column)
               (reduce #'+ column))
           #2A((0 1)
               (2 3)
               (5 7)) 0) ; => #(7 11)

But the function is more general than this: the arguments inner and outer allow arbitrary permutations before splitting.

recycle

Finally, recycle allows you to reuse the elements of the first argument, object, to create new arrays by extending the dimensions. The :outer keyword repeats the original object and :inner keyword argument repeats the elements of object. When both :inner and :outer are nil, object is returned as is. Non-array objects are intepreted as rank 0 arrays, following the usual semantics.

(aops:recycle #(2 3) :inner 2 :outer 4)
; => #3A(((2 2) (3 3))
         ((2 2) (3 3))
         ((2 2) (3 3))
	     ((2 2) (3 3)))

Three dimensional arrays can be tough to get your head around. In the example above, :outer asks for 4 2-element vectors, composed of repeating the elements of object twice, i.e. repeat ‘2’ twice and repeat ‘3’ twice. Compare this with :inner as 3:

(aops:recycle #(2 3) :inner 3 :outer 4)
; #3A(((2 2 2) (3 3 3))
      ((2 2 2) (3 3 3))
	  ((2 2 2) (3 3 3))
	  ((2 2 2) (3 3 3)))

map-array

map-array maps a function over the elements of an array.

(aops:map-array #2A((1.7 2.1 4.3 5.4)
                    (0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6))
				#'log)
; #2A((0.53062826 0.7419373 1.4586151 1.686399)
;     (-1.2039728 -0.9162907 -0.6931472 -0.5108256))

Note: This was moved to numerical-utilites in anticipation of consolidating nu:matrix and array-operations. That effort has stalled. We should probably move it back here.

Indexing operations

nested-loop

nested-loop is a simple macro which iterates over a set of indices with a given range

(defparameter A #2A((1 2) (3 4)))

(aops:nested-loop (i j) (array-dimensions A)
  (setf (aref A i j) (* 2 (aref A i j))))
A ; => #2A((2 4) (6 8))

(aops:nested-loop (i j) '(2 3)
  (format t "(~a ~a) " i j)) ; => (0 0) (0 1) (0 2) (1 0) (1 1) (1 2)

sum-index

sum-index is a macro which uses a code walker to determine the dimension sizes, summing over the given index or indices

(defparameter A #2A((1 2) (3 4)))

;; Trace
(aops:sum-index i (aref A i i)) ; => 5

;; Sum array
(aops:sum-index (i j) (aref A i j)) ; => 10

;; Sum array
(aops:sum-index i (row-major-aref A i)) ; => 10

The main use for sum-index is in combination with each-index.

each-index

each-index is a macro which creates an array and iterates over the elements. Like sum-index it is given one or more index symbols, and uses a code walker to find array dimensions.

(defparameter A #2A((1 2)
                    (3 4)))
(defparameter B #2A((5 6)
                    (7 8)))

;; Transpose
(aops:each-index (i j) (aref A j i)) ; => #2A((1 3)
                                     ;        (2 4))

;; Sum columns
(aops:each-index i
  (aops:sum-index j
    (aref A j i))) ; => #(4 6)

;; Matrix-matrix multiply
(aops:each-index (i j)
   (aops:sum-index k
      (* (aref A i k) (aref B k j)))) ; => #2A((19 22)
	                                  ;        (43 50))

reduce-index

reduce-index is a more general version of sum-index; it applies a reduction operation over one or more indices.

(defparameter A #2A((1 2)
                    (3 4)))

;; Sum all values in an array
(aops:reduce-index #'+ i (row-major-aref A i)) ; => 10

;; Maximum value in each row
(aops:each-index i
  (aops:reduce-index #'max j
    (aref A i j)))  ; => #(2 4)

Reducing

Some reductions over array elements can be done using the Common Lisp reduce function, together with aops:flatten, which returns a displaced vector:

(defparameter a #2A((1 2)
                    (3 4)))
(reduce #'max (aops:flatten a)) ; => 4

argmax & argmin

argmax and argmin find the row-major-aref index where an array value is maximum or minimum. They both return two values: the first value is the index; the second is the array value at that index.

(defparameter a #(1 2 5 4 2))
(aops:argmax a) ; => 2 5
(aops:argmin a) ; => 0 1

vectorize-reduce

More complicated reductions can be done with vectorize-reduce, for example the maximum absolute difference between arrays:

(defparameter a #2A((1 2)
                    (3 4)))
(defparameter b #2A((2 2)
                    (1 3)))

(aops:vectorize-reduce #'max (a b) (abs (- a b))) ; => 2

best

best compares two arrays according to a function and returns the ‘best’ value found. The function, FN must accept two inputs and return true/false. This function is applied to elements of ARRAY. The row-major-aref index is returned.

Example: The index of the maximum is

   * (best #'> #(1 2 3 4))
    3   ; row-major index
    4   ; value

most

most finds the element of ARRAY that returns the value closest to positive infinity when FN is applied to the array value. Returns the row-major-aref index, and the winning value.

Example: The maximum of an array is:

     (most #'identity #(1 2 3))
     -> 2    (row-major index)
        3    (value)

and the minimum of an array is:

      (most #'- #(1 2 3))
        0
        -1

See also reduce-index above.

Scalar values

Library functions treat non-array objects as if they were equivalent to 0-dimensional arrays: for example, (aops:split array (rank array)) returns an array that effectively equivalent (eq) to array. Another example is recycle:

(aops:recycle 4 :inner '(2 2)) ; => #2A((4 4)
                               ;        (4 4))

Stacking

You can stack compatible arrays by column or row. Metaphorically you can think of these operations as stacking blocks. For example stacking two row vectors yields a 2x2 array:

(stack-rows #(1 2) #(3 4))
;; #2A((1 2)
;;     (3 4))

Like other functions, there are two versions: generalised stacking, with rows and columns of type T and specialised versions where the element-type is specified. The versions allowing you to specialise the element type end in *.

The stack functions use object dimensions (as returned by dims to determine how to use the object.

  • when the object has 0 dimensions, fill a column with the element
  • when the object has 1 dimension, use it as a column
  • when the object has 2 dimensions, use it as a matrix

copy-row-major-block is a utility function in the stacking package that does what it suggests; it copies elements from one array to another. This function should be used to implement copying of contiguous row-major blocks of elements.

rows

stack-rows-copy is the method used to implement the copying of objects in stack-row*, by copying the elements of source to destination, starting with the row index start-row in the latter. Elements are coerced to element-type.

stack-rows and stack-rows* stack objects row-wise into an array of the given element-type, coercing if necessary. Always return a simple array of rank 2. stack-rows always returns an array with elements of type T, stack-rows* coerces elements to the specified type.

columns

stack-cols-copy is a method used to implement the copying of objects in stack-col*, by copying the elements of source to destination, starting with the column index start-col in the latter. Elements are coerced to element-type.

stack-cols and stack-cols* stack objects column-wise into an array of the given element-type, coercing if necessary. Always return a simple array of rank 2. stack-cols always returns an array with elements of type T, stack-cols* coerces elements to the specified type.

arbitrary

stack and stack* stack array arguments along axis. element-type determines the element-type of the result.

(defparameter *a1* #(0 1 2))
(defparameter *a2* #(3 5 7))
(aops:stack 0 *a1* *a2*) ; => #(0 1 2 3 5 7)
(aops:stack 1
          (aops:reshape-col *a1*)
          (aops:reshape-col *a2*)) ; => #2A((0 3)
	                               ;        (1 5)
								   ;        (2 7))

2 - Data Frame

Manipulating data using a data frame

Overview

A common lisp data frame is a collection of observations of sample variables that shares many of the properties of arrays and lists. By design it can be manipulated using the same mechanisms used to manipulate lisp arrays. This allow you to, for example, transform a data frame into an array and use array-operations to manipulate it, and then turn it into a data frame again to use in modeling or plotting.

Data frame is implemented as a two-dimensional common lisp data structure: a vector of vectors for data, and a hash table mapping variable names to column vectors. All columns are of equal length. This structure provides the flexibility required for column oriented manipulation, as well as speed for large data sets.

Load/install

Data-frame is part of the Lisp-Stat package. It can be used independently if desired. Since the examples in this manual use Lisp-Stat functionality, we’ll use it from there rather than load independently.

(ql:quickload :lisp-stat)

Within the Lisp-Stat system, the LS-USER package is the package for you to do statistics work. Type the following to change to that package:

(in-package :ls-user)

Naming conventions

Lisp-Stat has a few naming conventions you should be aware of. If you see a punctuation mark or the letter ‘p’ as the last letter of a function name, it indicates something about the function:

  • ‘!’ indicates that the function is destructive. It will modify the data that you pass to it. Otherwise, it will return a copy that you will need to save in a variable.
  • ‘p’, ‘-p’ or ‘?’ means the function is a predicate, that is returns a Boolean truth value.

Data frame environment

Although you can work with data frames bound to symbols (as would happen if you used (defparameter ...), it is more convenient to define them as part of an environment. When you do this, the system defines a package of the same name as the data frame, and provides a symbol for each variable. Let’s see how things work without an environment:

First, we define a data frame as a parameter:

(defparameter mtcars (read-csv rdata:mtcars)
"Motor Trend Car Road Tests")
;; WARNING: Missing column name was filled in
;; MTCARS2

Now if we want a column, we can say:

(column mtcars 'mpg)

Now let’s define an environment using defdf:

(defdf mtcars (read-csv rdata:mtcars)
"Motor Trend Car Road Tests")
;; WARNING: Missing column name was filled in
;; #<DATA-FRAME (32 observations of 12 variables)
;; Motor Trend Car Road Tests>

Now we can access the same variable with:

mtcars:mpg

defdf does a lot more than this, and you should probably use defdf to set up an environment instead of defparameter. We mention it here because there’s an important bit about maintaining the environment to be aware of:

defdf

The defdf macro is conceptually equivalent to the Common Lisp defparameter, but with some additional functionality that makes working with data frames easier. You use it the same way you’d use defparameter, for example:

(defdf foo <any-function returning a data frame> )

We’ll use both ways of defining data frames in this manual. The access methods that are defined by defdf are described in the access data section.

Data types

It is important to note that there are two ‘types’ in Lisp-Stat: the implementation type and the ‘statistical’ type. Sometimes these are the same, such as in the case of reals; in other situations they are not. A good example of this can be seen in the mtcars data set. The hp (horsepower), gear and carb are all of type integer from an implementation perspective. However only horsepower is a continuous variable. You can have an additional 0.5 horsepower, but you cannot add an additional 0.5 gears or carburetors.

Data types are one kind of property that can be set on a variable.

As part of the recoding and data cleansing process, you will want to add properties to your variables. In Common Lisp, these are plists that reside on the variable symbols, e.g. mtcars:mpg. In R they are known as attributes. By default, there are three properties for each variable: type, unit and label (documentation). When you load from external formats, like CSV, these properties are all nil; when you load from a lisp file, they will have been saved along with the data (if you set them).

There are seven data types in Lisp-Stat:

  • string
  • integer
  • double-float
  • single-float
  • categorical (factor in R)
  • temporal
  • bit (Boolean)

Numeric

Numeric types, double-float, single-float and integer are all essentially similar. The vector versions have type definitions (from the numeric-utilities package) of:

  • simple-double-float-vector
  • simple-single-float-vector
  • simple-fixnum-vector

As an example, let’s look at mtcars:mpg, where we have a variable of type float, but a few integer values mixed in.

The values may be equivalent, but the types are not. The CSV loader has no way of knowing, so loads the column as a mixture of integers and floats. Let’s start by reloading mtcars from the CSV file:

(undef 'mtcars)
(defdf mtcars (read-csv rdata:mtcars))

and look at the mpg variable:

LS-USER> mtcars:mpg
#(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0 18.1d0 14.3d0 24.4d0 22.8d0 19.2d0 17.8d0 16.4d0
  17.3d0 15.2d0 10.4d0 10.4d0 14.7d0 32.4d0 30.4d0 33.9d0 21.5d0 15.5d0 15.2d0
  13.3d0 19.2d0 27.3d0 26 30.4d0 15.8d0 19.7d0 15 21.4d0)
LS-USER> (type-of *)
(SIMPLE-VECTOR 32)

Notice that the first two entries in the vector are integers, and the remainder floats. To fix this manually, you will need to coerce each element of the column to type double-float (you could use single-float in this case; as a matter of habit we usually use double-float) and then change the type of the vector to a specialised float vector.

You can use the heuristicate-types function to guess the statistical types for you. For reals and strings, heuristicate-types works fine, however because integers and bits can be used to encode categorical or numeric values, you will have to indicate the type using set-properties. We see this below with gear and carb, although implemented as integer, they are actually type categorical. The next sections describes how to set them.

Using describe, we can view the types of all the variables that heuristicate-types set:

LS-USER> (heuristicate-types mtcars)
LS-USER> (describe mtcars)
MTCARS
  A data-frame with 32 observations of 12 variables

Variable | Type         | Unit | Label
-------- | ----         | ---- | -----------
X8       | STRING       | NIL  | NIL
MPG      | DOUBLE-FLOAT | NIL  | NIL
CYL      | INTEGER      | NIL  | NIL
DISP     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | NIL  | NIL
HP       | INTEGER      | NIL  | NIL
DRAT     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | NIL  | NIL
WT       | DOUBLE-FLOAT | NIL  | NIL
QSEC     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | NIL  | NIL
VS       | BIT          | NIL  | NIL
AM       | BIT          | NIL  | NIL
GEAR     | INTEGER      | NIL  | NIL
CARB     | INTEGER      | NIL  | NIL

Notice the system correctly typed vs and am as Boolean (bit) (correct in a mathematical sense)

Strings

Unlike in R, strings are not considered categorical variables by default. Ordering of strings varies according to locale, so it’s not a good idea to rely on the strings. Nevertheless, they do work well if you are working in a single locale.

Categorical

Categorical variables have a fixed and known set of possible values. In mtcars, gear, carb vs and am are categorical variables, but heuristicate-types can’t distinguish categorical types, so we’ll set them:

(set-properties mtcars :type '(:vs :categorical
			                    :am :categorical
			                    :gear :categorical
			                    :carb :categorical))

Temporal

Dates and times can be surprisingly complicated. To make working with them simpler, Lisp-Stat uses vectors of localtime objects to represent dates & times. You can set a temporal type with set-properties as well using the keyword :temporal.

Units & labels

To add units or labels to the data frame, use the set-properties function. This function takes a plist of variable/value pairs, so to set the units and labels:

(set-properties mtcars :unit '(:mpg m/g
	                   :cyl :NA
			           :disp in³
			           :hp hp
			           :drat :NA
			           :wt lb
			           :qsec s
			           :vs :NA
			           :am :NA
			           :gear :NA
			           :carb :NA))

(set-properties mtcars :label '(:mpg "Miles/(US) gallon"
				       :cyl "Number of cylinders"
                       :disp "Displacement (cu.in.)"
				       :hp "Gross horsepower"
				       :drat "Rear axle ratio"
				       :wt "Weight (1000 lbs)"
				       :qsec "1/4 mile time"
				       :vs "Engine (0=v-shaped, 1=straight)"
				       :am "Transmission (0=automatic, 1=manual)"
				       :gear "Number of forward gears"
				       :carb "Number of carburetors"))

Now look at the description again:

LS-USER> (describe mtcars)
MTCARS
  A data-frame with 32 observations of 12 variables

Variable | Type         | Unit | Label
-------- | ----         | ---- | -----------
X8       | STRING       | NIL  | NIL
MPG      | DOUBLE-FLOAT | M/G  | Miles/(US) gallon
CYL      | INTEGER      | NA   | Number of cylinders
DISP     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | IN3  | Displacement (cu.in.)
HP       | INTEGER      | HP   | Gross horsepower
DRAT     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | NA   | Rear axle ratio
WT       | DOUBLE-FLOAT | LB   | Weight (1000 lbs)
QSEC     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | S    | 1/4 mile time
VS       | BIT          | NA   | Engine (0=v-shaped, 1=straight)
AM       | BIT          | NA   | Transmission (0=automatic, 1=manual)
GEAR     | INTEGER      | NA   | Number of forward gears
CARB     | INTEGER      | NA   | Number of carburetors

You can set your own properties with this command too. To make your custom properties appear in the describe command and be saved automatically, override the describe and write-df methods, or use :after methods.

Create data-frames

A data frame can be created from a Common Lisp array, alist, plist, individual data vectors, another data frame or a vector-of vectors. In this section we’ll describe creating a data frame from each of these.

Data frame columns represent sample set variables, and its rows are observations (or cases).

(defmethod print-object ((df data-frame) stream)
  "Print the first six rows of DATA-FRAME"
  (let ((*print-lines* 6))
    (df:print-data df stream nil)))

(set-pprint-dispatch 'df:data-frame
		     #'(lambda (s df) (df:print-data df s nil)))

You can ignore the warning that you’ll receive after executing the code above.

Let’s create a simple data frame. First we’ll setup some variables (columns) to represent our sample domain:

(defparameter v #(1 2 3 4)) ; vector
(defparameter b #*0110)     ; bits
(defparameter s #(a b c d)) ; symbols
(defparameter plist `(:vector ,v :symbols ,s)) ;only v & s

Let’s print plist. Just type the name in at the REPL prompt.

plist
(:VECTOR #(1 2 3 4) :SYMBOLS #(A B C D))

From p/a-lists

Now suppose we want to create a data frame from a plist

(apply #'df plist)

;; VECTOR SYMBOLS
;;      1       A
;;      2       B
;;      3       C
;;      4       D

We could also have used the plist-df function:

(plist-df plist)

;; VECTOR SYMBOLS
;;      1       A
;;      2       B
;;      3       C
;;      4       D

and to demonstrate the same thing using an alist, we’ll use the alexandria:plist-alist function to convert the plist into an alist:

(alist-df (plist-alist plist))

;; VECTOR SYMBOLS
;;      1       A
;;      2       B
;;      3       C
;;      4       D

From vectors

You can use make-df to create a data frame from keys and a list of vectors. Each vector becomes a column in the data-frame.

(make-df '(:a :b)                 ; the keys
         '(#(1 2 3) #(10 20 30))) ; the columns
;; A  B
;; 1 10
;; 2 20
;; 3 30

This is useful if you’ve started working with variables defined with defparameter or defvar and want to combine them into a data frame.

From arrays

matrix-df converts a matrix (array) to a data-frame with the given keys.

(matrix-df #(:a :b) #2A((1 2)
	                    (3 4)))
;#<DATA-FRAME (2 observations of 2 variables)>

This is useful if you need to do a lot of numeric number-crunching on a data set as an array, perhaps with BLAS or array-operations then want to add categorical variables and continue processing as a data-frame.

Example datasets

Vincent Arel-Bundock maintains a library of over 1700 R datasets that is a consolidation of example data from various R packages. You can load one of these by specifying the url to the raw data to the read-csv function. For example to load the iris data set, use:

(defdf iris
	(read-csv "https://raw.githubusercontent.com/vincentarelbundock/Rdatasets/master/csv/datasets/iris.csv")
	"Edgar Anderson's Iris Data")

Default datasets

To make the examples and tutorials easier, Lisp-Stat includes the URLs for the R built in data sets. You can see these by viewing the rdata:*r-default-datasets* variable:

LS-USER? rdata:*r-default-datasets*
(RDATA:AIRPASSENGERS RDATA:ABILITY.COV RDATA:AIRMILES RDATA:AIRQUALITY
 RDATA:ANSCOMBE RDATA:ATTENU RDATA:ATTITUDE RDATA:AUSTRES RDATA:BJSALES
 RDATA:BOD RDATA:CARS RDATA:CHICKWEIGHT RDATA:CHICKWTS RDATA:CO2-1 RDATA:CO2-2
 RDATA:CRIMTAB RDATA:DISCOVERIES RDATA:DNASE RDATA:ESOPH RDATA:EURO
 RDATA:EUSTOCKMARKETS RDATA:FAITHFUL RDATA:FORMALDEHYDE RDATA:FREENY
 RDATA:HAIREYECOLOR RDATA:HARMAN23.COR RDATA:HARMAN74.COR RDATA:INDOMETH
 RDATA:INFERT RDATA:INSECTSPRAYS RDATA:IRIS RDATA:IRIS3 RDATA:ISLANDS
 RDATA:JOHNSONJOHNSON RDATA:LAKEHURON RDATA:LH RDATA:LIFECYCLESAVINGS
 RDATA:LOBLOLLY RDATA:LONGLEY RDATA:LYNX RDATA:MORLEY RDATA:MTCARS RDATA:NHTEMP
 RDATA:NILE RDATA:NOTTEM RDATA:NPK RDATA:OCCUPATIONALSTATUS RDATA:ORANGE
 RDATA:ORCHARDSPRAYS RDATA:PLANTGROWTH RDATA:PRECIP RDATA:PRESIDENTS
 RDATA:PRESSURE RDATA:PUROMYCIN RDATA:QUAKES RDATA:RANDU RDATA:RIVERS
 RDATA:ROCK RDATA:SEATBELTS RDATA::STUDENT-SLEEP RDATA:STACKLOSS
 RDATA:SUNSPOT.MONTH RDATA:SUNSPOT.YEAR RDATA:SUNSPOTS RDATA:SWISS RDATA:THEOPH
 RDATA:TITANIC RDATA:TOOTHGROWTH RDATA:TREERING RDATA:TREES RDATA:UCBADMISSIONS
 RDATA:UKDRIVERDEATHS RDATA:UKGAS RDATA:USACCDEATHS RDATA:USARRESTS
 RDATA:USJUDGERATINGS RDATA:USPERSONALEXPENDITURE RDATA:USPOP RDATA:VADEATHS
 RDATA:VOLCANO RDATA:WARPBREAKS RDATA:WOMEN RDATA:WORLDPHONES RDATA:WWWUSAGE)

To load one of these, you can use the name of the data set. For example to load mtcars:

(defdf mtcars
  (read-csv rdata:mtcars))

If you want to load all of the default R data sets, use the rdata:load-r-default-datasets command. All the data sets included in base R will now be loaded into your environment. This is useful if you are following a R tutorial, but using Lisp-Stat for the analysis software.

You may also want to save the default R data sets in order to augment the data with labels, units, types, etc. To save all of the default R data sets to the LS:DATA;R directory, use the (rdata:save-r-default-datasets) command if the default data sets have already been loaded, or save-r-data if they have not. This saves the data in lisp format.

Install R datasets

To work with all of the R data sets, we recommend you use git to download the repository to your hard drive. For example I downloaded the example data to the s: drive like this:

cd s:
git clone https://github.com/vincentarelbundock/Rdatasets.git

and setup a logical host in my ls-init.lisp file like so:

;;; Define logical hosts for external data sets
(setf (logical-pathname-translations "RDATA")
	`(("**;*.*.*" ,(merge-pathnames "csv/**/*.*" "s:/Rdatasets/"))))

Now you can access any of the datasets using the logical pathname. Here’s an example of creating a data frame using the ggplot mpg data set:

(defdf mpg (read-csv #P"RDATA:ggplot2;mpg.csv"))

Searching the examples

With so many data sets, it’s helpful to load the index into a data frame so you can search for specific examples. You can do this by loading the rdata:index into a data frame:

(defdf rindex (read-csv rdata:index))

I find it easiest to use the SQL-DF system to query this data. For example if you wanted to find the data sets with the largest number of observations:

(ql:quickload :sqldf)
(print-data
	(sqldf:sqldf "select item, title, rows, cols from rindex order by rows desc limit 10"))

;;   ITEM            TITLE                                                               ROWS COLS
;; 0 military        US Military Demographics                                         1414593    6
;; 1 Birthdays       US Births in 1969 - 1988                                          372864    7
;; 2 wvs_justifbribe Attitudes about the Justifiability of Bribe-Taking in the ...     348532    6
;; 3 flights         Flights data                                                      336776   19
;; 4 wvs_immig       Attitudes about Immigration in the World Values Survey            310388    6
;; 5 Fertility       Fertility and Women's Labor Supply                                254654    8
;; 6 avandia         Cardiovascular problems for two types of Diabetes medicines       227571    2
;; 7 AthleteGrad     Athletic Participation, Race, and Graduation                      214555    3
;; 8 mortgages       Data from "How do Mortgage Subsidies Affect Home Ownership? ..."  214144    6
;; 9 mammogram       Experiment with Mammogram Randomized

Export data frames

These next few functions are the reverse of the ones above used to create them. These are useful when you want to use foreign libraries or common lisp functions to process the data.

For this section of the manual, we are going to work with a subset of the mtcars data set from above. We’ll use the select package to take the first 5 rows so that the data transformations are easier to see.

(defparameter mtcars-small (select mtcars (range 0 5) t))

The next three functions convert a data-frame to and from standard common lisp data structures. This is useful if you’ve got data in Common Lisp format and want to work with it in a data frame, or if you’ve got a data frame and want to apply Common Lisp operators on it that don’t exist in df.

as-alist

Just like it says on the tin, as-alist takes a data frame and returns an alist version of it (formatted here for clearer output – a pretty printer that outputs an alist in this format would be a welcome addition to Lisp-Stat)

(as-alist mtcars-small)
;; ((MTCARS:X1 . #("Mazda RX4" "Mazda RX4 Wag" "Datsun 710" "Hornet 4 Drive" "Hornet Sportabout"))
;;  (MTCARS:MPG . #(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0))
;;  (MTCARS:CYL . #(6 6 4 6 8))
;;  (MTCARS:DISP . #(160 160 108 258 360))
;;  (MTCARS:HP . #(110 110 93 110 175))
;;  (MTCARS:DRAT . #(3.9d0 3.9d0 3.85d0 3.08d0 3.15d0))
;;  (MTCARS:WT . #(2.62d0 2.875d0 2.32d0 3.215d0 3.44d0))
;;  (MTCARS:QSEC . #(16.46d0 17.02d0 18.61d0 19.44d0 17.02d0))
;;  (MTCARS:VS . #*00110)
;;  (MTCARS:AM . #*11100)
;;  (MTCARS:GEAR . #(4 4 4 3 3))
;;  (MTCARS:CARB . #(4 4 1 1 2)))

as-plist

Similarly, as-plist will return a plist:

(as-plist mtcars-small)
;; (MTCARS:X1 #("Mazda RX4" "Mazda RX4 Wag" "Datsun 710" "Hornet 4 Drive" "Hornet Sportabout")
;;  MTCARS:MPG #(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0)
;;	MTCARS:CYL #(6 6 4 6 8)
;;	MTCARS:DISP #(160 160 108 258 360)
;;	MTCARS:HP #(110 110 93 110 175)
;;	MTCARS:DRAT #(3.9d0 3.9d0 3.85d0 3.08d0 3.15d0)
;;	MTCARS:WT #(2.62d0 2.875d0 2.32d0 3.215d0 3.44d0)
;;	MTCARS:QSEC #(16.46d0 17.02d0 18.61d0 19.44d0 17.02d0)
;;	MTCARS:VS #*00110
;;	MTCARS:AM #*11100
;;	MTCARS:GEAR #(4 4 4 3 3)
;;	MTCARS:CARB #(4 4 1 1 2))

as-array

as-array returns the data frame as a row-major two dimensional lisp array. You’ll want to save the variable names using the keys function to make it easy to convert back (see matrix-df). One of the reasons you might want to use this function is to manipulate the data-frame using array-operations. This is particularly useful when you have data frames of all numeric values.

(defparameter mtcars-keys (keys mtcars)) ; we'll use later
(defparameter mtcars-small-array (as-array mtcars-small))
mtcars-small-array
;; 0 Mazda RX4         21.0 6 160 110 3.90 2.620 16.46 0 1 4 4
;; 1 Mazda RX4 Wag     21.0 6 160 110 3.90 2.875 17.02 0 1 4 4
;; 2 Datsun 710        22.8 4 108  93 3.85 2.320 18.61 1 1 4 1
;; 3 Hornet 4 Drive    21.4 6 258 110 3.08 3.215 19.44 1 0 3 1
;; 4 Hornet Sportabout 18.7 8 360 175 3.15 3.440 17.02 0 0 3 2

Our abbreviated mtcars data frame is now a two dimensional Common Lisp array. It may not look like one because Lisp-Stat will ‘print pretty’ arrays. You can inspect it with the describe command to make sure:

LS-USER> (describe mtcars-small-array)
...

Type: (SIMPLE-ARRAY T (5 12))
Class: #<BUILT-IN-CLASS SIMPLE-ARRAY>
Element type: T
Rank: 2
Physical size: 60

vectors

The columns function returns the variables of the data frame as a vector of vectors:

(columns mtcars-small)
; #(#("Mazda RX4" "Mazda RX4 Wag" "Datsun 710" "Hornet 4 Drive" "Hornet Sportabout")
;   #(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0)
;	#(6 6 4 6 8)
;	#(160 160 108 258 360)
;	#(110 110 93 110 175)
;	#(3.9d0 3.9d0 3.85d0 3.08d0 3.15d0)
;	#(2.62d0 2.875d0 2.32d0 3.215d0 3.44d0)
;	#(16.46d0 17.02d0 18.61d0 19.44d0 17.02d0)
;	#*00110
;	#*11100
;	#(4 4 4 3 3)
;	#(4 4 1 1 2))

This is a column-major lisp array.

You can also pass a selection to the columns function to return specific columns:

(columns mtcars-small 'mpg)
; #(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0)

The functions in array-operations are helpful in further dealing with data frames as vectors and arrays. For example you could convert a data frame to a transposed array by using aops:combine with the columns function:

(combine (columns mtcars-small))
;;  0 Mazda RX4 Mazda RX4 Wag Datsun 710 Hornet 4 Drive Hornet Sportabout
;;  1     21.00        21.000      22.80         21.400             18.70
;;  2      6.00         6.000       4.00          6.000              8.00
;;  3    160.00       160.000     108.00        258.000            360.00
;;  4    110.00       110.000      93.00        110.000            175.00
;;  5      3.90         3.900       3.85          3.080              3.15
;;  6      2.62         2.875       2.32          3.215              3.44
;;  7     16.46        17.020      18.61         19.440             17.02
;;  8      0.00         0.000       1.00          1.000              0.00
;;  9      1.00         1.000       1.00          0.000              0.00
;; 10      4.00         4.000       4.00          3.000              3.00
;; 11      4.00         4.000       1.00          1.000              2.00

Load data

There are two functions for loading data. The first data makes loading from logical pathnames convenient. The other, read-csv works with the file system or URLs. Although the name read-csv implies only CSV (comma separated values), it can actually read with other delimiters, such as the tab character. See the DFIO API reference for more information.

The data command

For built in Lisp-Stat data sets, you can load with just the data set name. For example to load mtcars:

(data :mtcars)

If you’ve installed the R data sets, and want to load the antigua data set from the daag package, you could do it like this:

(data :antigua :system :rdata :directory :daag :type :csv)

If the file type is not lisp (say it’s TSV or CSV), you need to specify the type parameter.

From strings

Here is a short demonstration of reading from strings:

(defparameter *d*
  (read-csv
   (format nil "Gender,Age,Height~@
              \"Male\",30,180.~@
              \"Male\",31,182.7~@
               \"Female\",32,1.65e2")))

dfio tries to hard to decipher the various number formats sometimes encountered in CSV files:

(select (dfio:read-csv
                 (format nil "\"All kinds of wacky number formats\"~%.7~%19.~%.7f2"))
                t 'all-kinds-of-wacky-number-formats)
; => #(0.7d0 19.0d0 70.0)

From files

We saw above that dfio can read from strings, so one easy way to read from a file is to use the uiop system function read-file-string. We can read one of the example data files included with Lisp-Stat like this:

(read-csv
	(uiop:read-file-string #P"LS:DATA;absorbtion.csv"))
;;    IRON ALUMINUM ABSORPTION 
;;  0   61       13          4
;;  1  175       21         18
;;  2  111       24         14
;;  3  124       23         18
;;  4  130       64         26
;;  5  173       38         26 ..

That example just illustrates reading from a file to a string. In practice you’re better off just reading the file in directly and avoid reading into a string first:

(read-csv #P"LS:DATA;absorbtion.csv")
;;    IRON ALUMINUM ABSORPTION
;;  0   61       13          4
;;  1  175       21         18
;;  2  111       24         14
;;  3  124       23         18
;;  4  130       64         26
;;  5  173       38         26 ..

From URLs

dfio can also read from Common Lisp streams. Stream operations can be network or file based. Here is an example of how to read the classic Iris data set over the network:

(read-csv
   "https://raw.githubusercontent.com/vincentarelbundock/Rdatasets/master/csv/datasets/iris.csv")

;;     X27 SEPAL-LENGTH SEPAL-WIDTH PETAL-LENGTH PETAL-WIDTH SPECIES
;;   0   1          5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2 setosa
;;   1   2          4.9         3.0          1.4         0.2 setosa
;;   2   3          4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2 setosa
;;   3   4          4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2 setosa
;;   4   5          5.0         3.6          1.4         0.2 setosa
;;   5   6          5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4 setosa ..

From a database

You can load data from a SQLite table using the read-table command. Here’s an example of reading the iris data frame from a SQLite table:

(asdf:load-system :sqldf)
(defdf iris
	(sqldf:read-table
		(sqlite:connect #P"S:\\src\\lisp-stat\\data\\iris.db3")
		"iris"))

Note that sqlite:connect does not take a logical pathname; use a system path appropriate for your computer. One reason you might want to do this is for speed in loading CSV. The CSV loader for SQLite is 10-15 times faster than the fastest Common Lisp CSV parser, and it is often quicker to load to SQLite first, then load into Lisp.

Save data

Data frames can be saved into any delimited text format supported by fare-csv, or several flavors of JSON, such as Vega-Lite.

As CSV

To save the mtcars data frame to disk, you could use:

(write-csv mtcars
		   #P"LS:DATA;mtcars.csv"
           :add-first-row t)         ; add column headers

to save it as CSV, or to save it to tab-separated values:

(write-csv mtcars
	       #P"LS:DATA;mtcars.tsv"
	       :separator #\tab
		   :add-first-row t)         ; add column headers

As Lisp

For the most part, you will want to save your data frames as lisp. Doing so is both faster in loading, but more importantly it preserves any variable attributes that may have been given.

To save a data frame, use the save command:

(save 'mtcars #P"LS:DATA;mtcars-example")

Note that in this case you are passing the symbol to the function, not the value (thus the quote (') before the name of the data frame). Also note that the system will add the ‘lisp’ suffix for you.

To a database

The write-table function can be used to save a data frame to a SQLite database. Each take a connection to a database, which may be file or memory based, a table name and a data frame. Multiple data frames, with different table names, may be written to a single SQLite file this way.

Access data

This section describes various way to access data variables.

Define a data-frame

Let’s use defdf to define the iris data frame. We’ll use both of these data frames in the examples below.

(defdf iris
  (read-csv rdata:iris))
;WARNING: Missing column name was filled in

We now have a global variable named iris that represents the data frame. Let’s look at the first part of this data:

(head iris)
;;   X29 SEPAL-LENGTH SEPAL-WIDTH PETAL-LENGTH PETAL-WIDTH SPECIES
;; 0   1          5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2 setosa
;; 1   2          4.9         3.0          1.4         0.2 setosa
;; 2   3          4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2 setosa
;; 3   4          4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2 setosa
;; 4   5          5.0         3.6          1.4         0.2 setosa
;; 5   6          5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4 setosa

Notice a couple of things. First, there is a column X29. In fact if you look back at previous data frame output in this tutorial you will notice various columns named X followed by some number. This is because the column was not given a name in the data set, so a name was generated for it. X starts at 1 and increased by 1 each time an unnamed variable is encountered during your Lisp-Stat session. The next time you start Lisp-Stat, numbering will begin from 1 again. We will see how to clean this up this data frame in the next sections.

The second thing to note is the row numbers on the far left side. When Lisp-Stat prints a data frame it automatically adds row numbers. Row and column numbering in Lisp-Stat start at 0. In R they start with 1. Row numbers make it convenient to select data sections from a data frame, but they are not part of the data and cannot be selected or manipulated themselves. They only appear when a data frame is printed.

Access a variable

The defdf macro also defines symbol macros that allow you to refer to a variable by name, for example to refer to the mpg column of mtcars, you can refer to it by the the name data-frame:variable convention.

mtcars:mpg
; #(21 21 22.8D0 21.4D0 18.7D0 18.1D0 14.3D0 24.4D0 22.8D0 19.2D0 17.8D0 16.4D0
  17.3D0 15.2D0 10.4D0 10.4D0 14.7D0 32.4D0 30.4D0 33.9D0 21.5D0 15.5D0 15.2D0
  13.3D0 19.2D0 27.3D0 26 30.4D0 15.8D0 19.7D0 15 21.4D0)

There is a point of distinction to be made here: the values of mpg and the column mpg. For example to obtain the same vector using the selection/sub-setting package select we must refer to the column:

(select mtcars t 'mpg)
; #(21 21 22.8D0 21.4D0 18.7D0 18.1D0 14.3D0 24.4D0 22.8D0 19.2D0 17.8D0 16.4D0
  17.3D0 15.2D0 10.4D0 10.4D0 14.7D0 32.4D0 30.4D0 33.9D0 21.5D0 15.5D0 15.2D0
  13.3D0 19.2D0 27.3D0 26 30.4D0 15.8D0 19.7D0 15 21.4D0)

Note that with select we passed the symbol 'mpg (you can tell it’s a symbol because of the quote in front of it).

So, the rule here is: if you want the value refer to it directly, e.g. mtcars:mpg. If you are referring to the column, use the symbol. Data frame operations sometimes require the symbol, where as Common Lisp and other packages that take vectors use the direct access form.

Data-frame operations

These functions operate on data-frames as a whole.

copy

copy returns a newly allocated data-frame with the same values as the original:

(copy mtcars-small)
;;   X1                 MPG CYL DISP  HP DRAT    WT  QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB
;; 0 Mazda RX4         21.0   6  160 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
;; 1 Mazda RX4 Wag     21.0   6  160 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4
;; 2 Datsun 710        22.8   4  108  93 3.85 2.320 18.61  1  1    4    1
;; 3 Hornet 4 Drive    21.4   6  258 110 3.08 3.215 19.44  1  0    3    1
;; 4 Hornet Sportabout 18.7   8  360 175 3.15 3.440 17.02  0  0    3    2

By default only the keys are copied and the original data remains the same, i.e. a shallow copy. For a deep copy, use the copy-array function as the key:

(copy mtcars-small :key #'copy-array)
;;   X1                 MPG CYL DISP  HP DRAT    WT  QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB
;; 0 Mazda RX4         21.0   6  160 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
;; 1 Mazda RX4 Wag     21.0   6  160 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4
;; 2 Datsun 710        22.8   4  108  93 3.85 2.320 18.61  1  1    4    1
;; 3 Hornet 4 Drive    21.4   6  258 110 3.08 3.215 19.44  1  0    3    1
;; 4 Hornet Sportabout 18.7   8  360 175 3.15 3.440 17.02  0  0    3    2

Useful when applying destructive operations to the data-frame.

keys

Returns a vector of the variables in the data frame. The keys are symbols. Symbol properties describe the variable, for example units.

(keys mtcars)
; #(X45 MPG CYL DISP HP DRAT WT QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB)

Recall the earlier discussion of X1 for the column name.

map-df

map-df transforms one data-frame into another, row-by-row. Its function signature is:

(map-df data-frame keys function result-keys) ...

It applies function to each row, and returns a data frame with the result-keys as the column (variable) names. keys is a list. You can also specify the type of the new variables in the result-keys list.

The goal for this example is to transform df1:

(defparameter df1 (make-df '(:a :b) '(#(2  3  5)
                                      #(7 11 13))))

into a data-frame that consists of the product of :a and :b, and a bit mask of the columns that indicate where the value is <= 30. First we’ll need a helper for the bit mask:

(defun predicate-bit (a b)
  "Return 1 if a*b <= 30, 0 otherwise"
  (if (<= 30 (* a b))
      1
      0))

Now we can transform df1 into our new data-frame, df2, with:

(defparameter df2 (map-df df1
                          '(:a :b)
			              (lambda (a b)
			                (vector (* a b) (predicate-bit a b)))
			              '((:p fixnum) (:m bit))))

Since it was a parameter assignment, we have to view it manually:

(print-df df2)
;;    P M
;; 0 14 0
;; 1 33 1
;; 2 65 1

Note how we specified both the new key names and their type. Here’s an example that transforms the units of mtcars from imperial to metric:

(map-df mtcars '(x1 mpg disp hp wt)
	(lambda (model mpg disp hp wt)
	  (vector model ;no transformation for model (X1), return as-is
              (/ 235.214583 mpg)
		      (/ disp 61.024)
		      (* hp 1.01387)
		      (/ (* wt 1000) 2.2046)))
	'(:model (:100km/l float) (:disp float) (:hp float) (:kg float)))

;;    MODEL                 100KM/L    DISP        HP         KG
;;  0 Mazda RX4             11.2007  2.6219  111.5257  1188.4242
;;  1 Mazda RX4 Wag         11.2007  2.6219  111.5257  1304.0914
;;  2 Datsun 710            10.3164  1.7698   94.2899  1052.3451
;;  3 Hornet 4 Drive        10.9913  4.2278  111.5257  1458.3144
;;  4 Hornet Sportabout     12.5783  5.8993  177.4272  1560.3737
;;  5 Valiant               12.9953  3.6871  106.4564  1569.4456 ..

Note that you may have to adjust the X column name to suit your current environment.

You might be wondering how we were able to refer to the columns without the ' (quote); in fact we did, at the beginning of the list. The lisp reader then reads the contents of the list as symbols.

print

The print-data command will print a data frame in a nicely formatted way, respecting the pretty printing row/column length variables:

(print-data mtcars)
;; MODEL                MPG CYL  DISP  HP DRAT    WT  QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB
;; Mazda RX4           21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
;; Mazda RX4 Wag       21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4
;; Datsun 710          22.8   4 108.0  93 3.85 2.320 18.61  1  1    4    1
;; Hornet 4 Drive      21.4   6 258.0 110 3.08 3.215 19.44  1  0    3    1
...
;; Output elided for brevity

rows

rows returns the rows of a data frame as a vector of vectors:

(rows mtcars-small)
;#(#("Mazda RX4" 21 6 160 110 3.9d0 2.62d0 16.46d0 0 1 4 4)
;  #("Mazda RX4 Wag" 21 6 160 110 3.9d0 2.875d0 17.02d0 0 1 4 4)
;  #("Datsun 710" 22.8d0 4 108 93 3.85d0 2.32d0 18.61d0 1 1 4 1)
;  #("Hornet 4 Drive" 21.4d0 6 258 110 3.08d0 3.215d0 19.44d0 1 0 3 1)
;  #("Hornet Sportabout" 18.7d0 8 360 175 3.15d0 3.44d0 17.02d0 0 0 3 2))

remove duplicates

The df-remove-duplicates function will remove duplicate rows. Let’s create a data-frame with duplicates:

(defparameter dup (make-df '(a b c) '(#(a1 a1 a3)
                                      #(a1 a1 b3)
									  #(a1 a1 c3))))
;DUP

;;    A  B  C
;; 0 A1 A1 A1
;; 1 A1 A1 A1
;; 2 A3 B3 C3

Now remove duplicate rows 0 and 1:

(df-remove-duplicates dup)
;; A  B  C
;; A1 A1 A1
;; A3 B3 C3

remove data-frame

If you are working with large data sets, you may wish to remove a data frame from your environment to save memory. The undef command does this:

LS-USER> (undef 'tooth-growth)
(TOOTH-GROWTH)

You can check that it was removed with the show-data-frames function, or by viewing the list df::*data-frames*.

list data-frames

To list the data frames in your environment, use the show-data-frames function. Here is an example of what is currently loaded into the authors environment. The data frames listed may be different for you, depending on what you have loaded.

To see this output, you’ll have to change to the standard print-object method, using this code:

(defmethod print-object ((df data-frame) stream)
  "Print DATA-FRAME dimensions and type
After defining this method it is permanently associated with data-frame objects"
  (print-unreadable-object (df stream :type t)
    (let ((description (and (slot-boundp df 'name)
			    (documentation (find-symbol (name df)) 'variable))))
    (format stream
	    "(~d observations of ~d variables)"
	    (aops:nrow df)
	    (aops:ncol df))
    (when description
      (format stream "~&~A" (short-string description))))))

Now, to see all the data frames in your environment:

LS-USER> (show-data-frames)
#<DATA-FRAME AQ (153 observations of 7 variables)>

#<DATA-FRAME MTCARS (32 observations of 12 variables)
Motor Trend Car Road Tests>

#<DATA-FRAME USARRESTS (50 observations of 5 variables)
Violent Crime Rates by US State>

#<DATA-FRAME PLANTGROWTH (30 observations of 3 variables)
Results from an Experiment on Plant Growth>

#<DATA-FRAME TOOTHGROWTH (60 observations of 4 variables)
The Effect of Vitamin C on Tooth Growth in Guinea Pigs>

with the :head t option, show-data-frames will print the first five rows of the data frame, similar to the head command:

LS-USER> (show-data-frames :head t)
AQ
;;  X5             OZONE SOLAR-R WIND TEMP MONTH DAY
;;   1           41.0000     190  7.4   67     5   1
;;   2           36.0000     118  8.0   72     5   2
;;   3           12.0000     149 12.6   74     5   3
;;   4           18.0000     313 11.5   62     5   4
;;   5           42.1293      NA 14.3   56     5   5
;;   6           28.0000      NA 14.9   66     5   6 ..

MTCARS
;; MODEL                MPG CYL  DISP  HP DRAT    WT  QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB
;; Mazda RX4           21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
;; Mazda RX4 Wag       21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4
;; Datsun 710          22.8   4 108.0  93 3.85 2.320 18.61  1  1    4    1
;; Hornet 4 Drive      21.4   6 258.0 110 3.08 3.215 19.44  1  0    3    1
;; Hornet Sportabout   18.7   8 360.0 175 3.15 3.440 17.02  0  0    3    2
;; Valiant             18.1   6 225.0 105 2.76 3.460 20.22  1  0    3    1 ..

;; Output elided for brevity

You, of course, may see different output depending on what data frames you currently have loaded.

Let’s change the print-object back to our convenience method.

(defmethod print-object ((df data-frame) stream)
  "Print the first six rows of DATA-FRAME"
  (let ((*print-lines* 6))
    (df:print-data df stream nil)))

stacking

Stacking is done with the array-operations stacking functions. Since these functions operate on both arrays and data frames, we can use them to stack data frames, arrays, or a mixture of both, providing they have a rank of 2. Here’s an example using the mtcars data frame:

(defparameter boss-mustang
  #("Boss Mustang" 12.7d0 8 302 405 4.11d0 2.77d0 12.5d0 0 1 4 4))

and now stack it onto the mtcars data set (load it with (data :mtcars) if you haven’t already done so):

(matrix-df
 (keys mtcars)
 (stack-rows mtcars boss-mustang))

This is the functional equivalent of R’s rbind function. You can also add columns with the stack-cols function.

An often asked question is: why don’t you have a dedicated stack-rows function? Well, if you want one it might look like this:

(defun stack-rows (df &rest objects)
  "Stack rows that works on matrices and/or data frames."
  (matrix-df
   (keys df)
   (apply #'aops:stack-rows (cons df objects))))

But now the data frame must be the first parameter passed to the function. Or perhaps you want to rename the columns? Or you have matrices as your starting point? For all those reasons, it makes more sense to pass in the column keys than a data frame:

(defun stack-rows (col-names &rest objects)
  "Stack rows that works on matrices and/or data frames."
  (matrix-df
   (keys col-names)
   (stack-rows objects)))

However this means we have two stack-rows functions, and you don’t really gain anything except an extra function call. So use the above definition if you like; we use the first example and call matrix-df and stack-rows to stack data frames.

Column operations

You have seen some of these functions before, and for completeness we repeat them here.

To obtain a variable (column) from a data frame, use the column function. Using the mtcars-small data frame, defined in export data frames above:

(column mtcars-small 'mpg)
;; #(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0)

To get all the columns as a vector, use the columns function:

(columns mtcars-small)
; #(#("Mazda RX4" "Mazda RX4 Wag" "Datsun 710" "Hornet 4 Drive" "Hornet Sportabout")
;   #(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0)
;	#(6 6 4 6 8)
;	#(160 160 108 258 360)
;	#(110 110 93 110 175)
;	#(3.9d0 3.9d0 3.85d0 3.08d0 3.15d0)
;	#(2.62d0 2.875d0 2.32d0 3.215d0 3.44d0)
;	#(16.46d0 17.02d0 18.61d0 19.44d0 17.02d0)
;	#*00110
;	#*11100
;	#(4 4 4 3 3)
;	#(4 4 1 1 2))

You can also return a subset of the columns by passing in a selection:

(columns mtcars-small '(mpg wt))
;; #(#(21 21 22.8d0 21.4d0 18.7d0) #(2.62d0 2.875d0 2.32d0 3.215d0 3.44d0))

Add columns

There are two ‘flavors’ of add functions, destructive and non-destructive. The latter return a new data frame as the result, and the destructive versions modify the data frame passed as a parameter. The destructive versions are denoted with a ‘!’ at the end of the function name.

The columns to be added can be in several formats:

  • plist
  • alist
  • (plist)
  • (alist)
  • (data-frame)

To add a single column to a data frame, use the add-column! function. We’ll use a data frame similar to the one used in our reading data-frames from a string example to illustrate column operations.

Create the data frame:

(defparameter *d* (read-csv
		   (format nil "Gender,Age,Height
                      \"Male\",30,180
                      \"Male\",31,182
                      \"Female\",32,165
	                  \"Male\",22,167
	                  \"Female\",45,170")))

and print it:

(head *d*)
;;   GENDER AGE HEIGHT
;; 0 Male    30    180
;; 1 Male    31    182
;; 2 Female  32    165
;; 3 Male    22    167
;; 4 Female  45    170

and add a ‘weight’ column to it:

(add-column! *d* 'weight #(75.2 88.5 49.4 78.1 79.4))

;;   GENDER AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT
;; 0 Male    30    180   75.2
;; 1 Male    31    182   88.5
;; 2 Female  32    165   49.4
;; 3 Male    22    167   78.1
;; 4 Female  45    170   79.4

now that we have weight, let’s add a BMI column to it to demonstrate using a function to compute the new column values:

(add-column! *d* 'bmi
	     (map-rows *d* '(height weight)
		       #'(lambda (h w) (/ w (square (/ h 100))))))
;;   SEX    AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT       BMI
;; 0 Female  10    180   75.2 23.209875
;; 1 Female  15    182   88.5 26.717787
;; 2 Male    20    165   49.4 18.145086
;; 3 Female  25    167   78.1 28.003874
;; 4 Male    30    170   79.4 27.474049

Now let’s add multiple columns destructively using add-columns!

(add-columns! *d* 'a #(1 2 3 4 5) 'b #(foo bar baz qux quux))

;; GENDER AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT       BMI A    B
;; Male    30    180   75.2   23.2099 1  FOO
;; Male    31    182   88.5   26.7178 2  BAR
;; Female  32    165   49.4   18.1451 3  BAZ
;; Male    22    167   78.1   28.0039 4  QUX
;; Female  45    170   79.4   27.4740 5 QUUX

Remove columns

Let’s remove the columns a and b that we just added above with the remove-columns function. Since it returns a new data frame, we’ll need to assign the return value to *d*:

(setf *d* (remove-columns *d* '(a b bmi)))

;; GENDER AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT       BMI
;; Male    30    180   75.2   23.2099
;; Male    31    182   88.5   26.7178
;; Female  32    165   49.4   18.1451
;; Male    22    167   78.1   28.0039
;; Female  45    170   79.4   27.4740

To remove columns destructively, meaning modifying the original data, use the remove-column! or remove-columns! functions.

Rename columns

Sometimes data sources can have variable names that we want to change. To do this, use the rename-column! function. This example will rename the ‘gender’ variable to ‘sex’:

(rename-column! *d* 'sex 'gender)

;;   SEX    AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT
;; 0 Male    30    180   75.2
;; 1 Male    31    182   88.5
;; 2 Female  32    165   49.4
;; 3 Male    22    167   78.1
;; 4 Female  45    170   79.4

If you used defdf to create your data frame, and this is the recommended way to define data frames, the variable references within the data package will have been updated. This is true for all destructive data frame operations. Let’s use this now to rename the mtcars X1 variable to model. First a quick look at the first 2 rows as they are now:

(head mtcars 2)
;;   X1                 MPG CYL DISP  HP DRAT    WT  QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB
;; 0 Mazda RX4         21.0   6  160 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
;; 1 Mazda RX4 Wag     21.0   6  160 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4

Replace X1 with model:

(rename-column! mtcars 'model 'x1)

Note: check to see what value your version of mtcars has. In this case, with a fresh start of Lisp-Stat, it has X1. It could have X2, X3, etc.

Now check that it worked:

(head mtcars 2)
;;   MODEL         MPG CYL DISP  HP DRAT    WT  QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB
;; 0 Mazda RX4      21   6  160 110  3.9 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
;; 1 Mazda RX4 Wag  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4

We can now refer to mtcars:model

mtcars:model
#("Mazda RX4" "Mazda RX4 Wag" "Datsun 710" "Hornet 4 Drive" "Hornet Sportabout"
  "Valiant" "Duster 360" "Merc 240D" "Merc 230" "Merc 280" "Merc 280C"
  "Merc 450SE" "Merc 450SL" "Merc 450SLC" "Cadillac Fleetwood"
  "Lincoln Continental" "Chrysler Imperial" "Fiat 128" "Honda Civic"
  "Toyota Corolla" "Toyota Corona" "Dodge Challenger" "AMC Javelin"
  "Camaro Z28" "Pontiac Firebird" "Fiat X1-9" "Porsche 914-2" "Lotus Europa"
  "Ford Pantera L" "Ferrari Dino" "Maserati Bora" "Volvo 142E")

Replace columns

Columns are “setf-able” places and the simplest way to replace a column is set the field to a new value. We’ll complement the sex field of *d*:

(df::setf (df:column *d* 'sex) #("Female" "Female" "Male" "Female" "Male"))
;#("Female" "Female" "Male" "Female" "Male")

Note that df::setf is not exported. Use this with caution.

You can also replace a column using two functions specifically for this purpose. Here we’ll replace the ‘age’ column with new values:

(replace-column *d* 'age #(10 15 20 25 30))
;;   SEX    AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT
;; 0 Female  10    180   75.2
;; 1 Female  15    182   88.5
;; 2 Male    20    165   49.4
;; 3 Female  25    167   78.1
;; 4 Male    30    170   79.4

That was a non-destructive replacement, and since we didn’t reassign the value of *d*, it is unchanged:

LS-USER> (print-data *d*)
;;   SEX    AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT
;; 0 Female  30    180   75.2
;; 1 Female  31    182   88.5
;; 2 Male    32    165   49.4
;; 3 Female  22    167   78.1
;; 4 Male    45    170   79.4

We can also use the destructive version to make a permanent change instead of setf-ing *d*:

(replace-column! *d* 'age #(10 15 20 25 30))
;;   SEX    AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT
;; 0 Female  10    180   75.2
;; 1 Female  15    182   88.5
;; 2 Male    20    165   49.4
;; 3 Female  25    167   78.1
;; 4 Male    30    170   79.4

Transform columns

There are two functions for column transformations, replace-column and map-columns.

replace-column

replace-column can be used to transform a column by applying a function to each value. This example will add 20 to each row of the age column:

(replace-column *d* 'age #'(lambda (x) (+ 20 x)))
;;   SEX    AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT
;; 0 Female  30    180   75.2
;; 1 Female  35    182   88.5
;; 2 Male    40    165   49.4
;; 3 Female  45    167   78.1
;; 4 Male    50    170   79.4

replace-column! can also apply functions to a column, destructively modifying the column.

map-columns

The map-columns functions can be thought of as applying a function on all the values of each variable/column as a vector, rather than the individual rows as replace-column does. To see this, we’ll use functions that operate on vectors, in this case nu:e+, which is the vector addition function for Lisp-Stat. Let’s see this working first:

(nu:e+ #(1 1 1) #(2 3 4))
; => #(3 4 5)

observe how the vectors were added element-wise. We’ll demonstrate map-columns by adding one to each of the numeric columns in the example data frame:

(map-columns (select *d* t '(weight age height))
	     #'(lambda (x)
		     (nu:e+ 1 x)))
;;   WEIGHT AGE HEIGHT
;; 0   76.2  11    181
;; 1   89.5  16    183
;; 2   50.4  21    166
;; 3   79.1  26    168
;; 4   80.4  31    171

recall that we used the non-destructive version of replace-column above, so *d* has the original values. Also note the use of select to get the numeric variables from the data frame; e+ can’t add categorical values like gender/sex.

Row operations

As the name suggests, row operations operate on each row, or observation, of a data set.

count-rows

This function is used to determine how many rows meet a certain condition. For example if you want to know how many cars have a MPG (miles-per-galleon) rating greater than 20, you could use:

(count-rows mtcars 'mpg #'(lambda (x) (< 20 x)))
; => 14

do-rows

do-rows applies a function on selected variables. The function must take the same number of arguments as variables supplied. It is analogous to dotimes, but iterating over data frame rows. No values are returned; it is purely for side-effects. Let’s create a new data data-frame to illustrate row operations:

LS-USER> (defparameter *d2*
                       (make-df '(a b) '(#(1 2 3) #(10 20 30))))
*D2*
LS-USER> *d2*
;;   A  B
;; 0 1 10
;; 1 2 20
;; 2 3 30

This example uses format to illustrate iterating using do-rows for side effect:

(do-rows *d2* '(a b) #'(lambda (a b) (format t "~A " (+ a b))))
11 22 33
; No value

map-rows

Where map-columns can be thought of as working through the data frame column-by-column, map-rows goes through row-by-row. Here we add the values in each row of two columns:

(map-rows *d2* '(a b) #'+)
#(11 22 33)

Since the length of this vector will always be equal to the data-frame column length, we can add the results to the data frame as a new column. Let’s see this in a real-world pattern, subtracting the mean from a column:

(add-column! *d2* 'c
           (map-rows *d2* 'b
                     #'(lambda (x) (- x (mean (select *d2* t 'b))))))
;;   A  B     C
;; 0 1 10 -10.0
;; 1 2 20   0.0
;; 2 3 30  10.0

You could also have used replace-column! in a similar manner to replace a column with normalize values.

mask-rows

mask-rows is similar to count-rows, except it returns a bit-vector for rows matching the predicate. This is useful when you want to pass the bit vector to another function, like select to retrieve only the rows matching the predicate.

(mask-rows mtcars 'mpg #'(lambda (x) (< 20 x)))
; => #*11110001100000000111100001110001

filter-rows

The filter-rows function will return a data-frame whose rows match the predicate. The function signature is:

(defun filter-rows (data body) ...

As an example, let’s filter mtcars to find all the cars whose fuel consumption is greater than 20 mpg:

(filter-rows mtcars '(< 20 mpg))
;=> #<DATA-FRAME (14 observations of 12 variables)>

To view them we’ll need to call the print-data function directly instead of using the print-object function we installed earlier. Otherwise, we’ll only see the first 6.

(print-data *)
;;    MODEL           MPG CYL  DISP  HP DRAT    WT  QSEC VS AM GEAR CARB
;;  0 Mazda RX4      21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
;;  1 Mazda RX4 Wag  21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4
;;  2 Datsun 710     22.8   4 108.0  93 3.85 2.320 18.61  1  1    4    1
;;  3 Hornet 4 Drive 21.4   6 258.0 110 3.08 3.215 19.44  1  0    3    1
;;  4 Merc 240D      24.4   4 146.7  62 3.69 3.190 20.00  1  0    4    2
;;  5 Merc 230       22.8   4 140.8  95 3.92 3.150 22.90  1  0    4    2
;;  6 Fiat 128       32.4   4  78.7  66 4.08 2.200 19.47  1  1    4    1
;;  7 Honda Civic    30.4   4  75.7  52 4.93 1.615 18.52  1  1    4    2
;;  8 Toyota Corolla 33.9   4  71.1  65 4.22 1.835 19.90  1  1    4    1
;;  9 Toyota Corona  21.5   4 120.1  97 3.70 2.465 20.01  1  0    3    1
;; 10 Fiat X1-9      27.3   4  79.0  66 4.08 1.935 18.90  1  1    4    1
;; 11 Porsche 914-2  26.0   4 120.3  91 4.43 2.140 16.70  0  1    5    2
;; 12 Lotus Europa   30.4   4  95.1 113 3.77 1.513 16.90  1  1    5    2
;; 13 Volvo 142E     21.4   4 121.0 109 4.11 2.780 18.60  1  1    4    2

Filter predicates can be more complex than this, here’s an example filtering the Vega movies data set (which we call imdb):

(filter-rows imdb
     '(and (not (eql imdb-rating :na))
	       (local-time:timestamp< release-date
	                              (local-time:parse-timestring "2019-01-01"))))

You can refer to any of the column/variable names in the data-frame directly when constructing the filter predicate. The predicate is turned into a lambda function, so let, etc is also possible.

Summarising data

Often the first thing you’ll want to do with a data frame is get a quick summary. You can do that with these functions, and we’ve seen most of them used in this manual. For more information about these functions, see the data-frame api reference.

nrow data-frame
return the number of rows in data-frame
ncol data-frame
return the number of columns in data-frame
dims data-frame
return the dimensions of data-frame as a list in (rows columns) format
keys data-frame
return a vector of symbols representing column names
column-names data-frame
returns a list of strings of the column names in data-frames
head data-frame &optional n
displays the first n rows of data-frame. n defaults to 6.
tail data-frame &optional n
displays the last n rows of data-frame. n defaults to 6.

describe

describe data-frame
returns the meta-data for the variables in data-frame

describe is a common lisp function that describes an object. In Lisp-Stat describe prints a description of the data frame and the three ‘standard’ properties of the variables: type, unit and description. It is similar to the str command in R. To see an example use the augmented mtcars data set included in Lisp-Stat. In this data set, we have added properties describing the variables. This is a good illustration of why you should always save data frames in lisp format; properties such as these are lost in CSV format.

(data :mtcars)
LS-USER> (describe mtcars)
MTCARS
  Motor Trend Car Road Tests
  A data-frame with 32 observations of 12 variables

Variable | Type         | Unit | Label
-------- | ----         | ---- | -----------
MODEL    | STRING       | NIL  | NIL
MPG      | DOUBLE-FLOAT | M/G  | Miles/(US) gallon
CYL      | INTEGER      | NA   | Number of cylinders
DISP     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | IN3  | Displacement (cu.in.)
HP       | INTEGER      | HP   | Gross horsepower
DRAT     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | NA   | Rear axle ratio
WT       | DOUBLE-FLOAT | LB   | Weight (1000 lbs)
QSEC     | DOUBLE-FLOAT | S    | 1/4 mile time
VS       | BIT          | NA   | Engine (0=v-shaped, 1=straight)
AM       | BIT          | NA   | Transmission (0=automatic, 1=manual)
GEAR     | INTEGER      | NA   | Number of forward gears
CARB     | INTEGER      | NA   | Number of carburetors

summary

summary data-frame
returns a summary of the variables in data-frame

Summary functions are one of those things that tend to be use-case or application specific. Witness the number of R summary packages; there are at least half a dozen, including hmisc, stat.desc, psych describe, skim and summary tools. In short, there is no one-size-fits-all way to provide summaries, so Lisp-Stat provides the data structures upon which users can customise the summary output. The output you see below is a simple :print-function for each of the summary structure types (numeric, factor, bit and generic).

LS-USER> (summary mtcars)
(

MPG (Miles/(US) gallon)
 n: 32
 missing: 0
 min=10.40
 q25=15.40
 q50=19.20
 mean=20.09
 q75=22.80
 max=33.90

CYL (Number of cylinders)
14 (44%) x 8, 11 (34%) x 4, 7 (22%) x 6,

DISP (Displacement (cu.in.))
 n: 32
 missing: 0
 min=71.10
 q25=120.65
 q50=205.87
 mean=230.72
 q75=334.00
 max=472.00

HP (Gross horsepower)
 n: 32
 missing: 0
 min=52
 q25=96.00
 q50=123
 mean=146.69
 q75=186.25
 max=335

DRAT (Rear axle ratio)
 n: 32
 missing: 0
 min=2.76
 q25=3.08
 q50=3.70
 mean=3.60
 q75=3.95
 max=4.93

WT (Weight (1000 lbs))
 n: 32
 missing: 0
 min=1.51
 q25=2.54
 q50=3.33
 mean=3.22
 q75=3.68
 max=5.42

QSEC (1/4 mile time)
 n: 32
 missing: 0
 min=14.50
 q25=16.88
 q50=17.71
 mean=17.85
 q75=18.90
 max=22.90

VS (Engine (0=v-shaped, 1=straight))
ones: 14 (44%)

AM (Transmission (0=automatic, 1=manual))
ones: 13 (41%)

GEAR (Number of forward gears)
15 (47%) x 3, 12 (38%) x 4, 5 (16%) x 5,

CARB (Number of carburetors)
10 (31%) x 4, 10 (31%) x 2, 7 (22%) x 1, 3 (9%) x 3, 1 (3%) x 6, 1 (3%) x 8, )

Note that the model column, essentially row-name was deleted from the output. The summary function, designed for human readable output, removes variables with all unique values, and those with monotonically increasing numbers (usually row numbers).

To build your own summary function, use the get-summaries function to get a list of summary structures for the variables in the data frame, and then print them as you wish.

columns

You can also describe or summarize individual columns:

LS-USER> (describe 'mtcars:mpg)
MTCARS:MPG
  [symbol]

MPG names a symbol macro:
  Expansion: (AREF (COLUMNS MTCARS) 1)

Symbol-plist:
  :TYPE -> DOUBLE-FLOAT
  :UNIT -> M/G
  :LABEL -> "Miles/(US) gallon"
LS-USER> (summarize-column 'mtcars:mpg)

MPG (Miles/(US) gallon)
 n: 32
 missing: 0
 min=10.40
 q25=15.40
 q50=19.20
 mean=20.09
 q75=22.80
 max=33.90

Missing values

Data sets often contain missing values and we need to both understand where and how many are missing, and how to transform or remove them for downstream operations. In Lisp-Stat, missing values are represented by the keyword symbol :na. You can control this encoding during delimited text import by passing an a-list containing the mapping. By default this is a keyword parameter map-alist:

(map-alist '((""   . :na)
             ("NA" . :na)))

The default maps blank cells ("") and ones containing “NA” (not available) to the keyword :na, which stands for missing. Some systems encode missing values as numeric, e.g. 99; in this case you can pass in a map-alist that includes this mapping:

(map-alist '((""   . :na)
             ("NA" . :na)
			 (99   . :na)))

We will use the R air-quality dataset to illustrate working with missing values. Let’s load it now:

(defdf aq
  (read-csv rdata:airquality))

Examine

To see missing values we use the predicate missingp. This works on sequences, arrays and data-frames. It returns a logical sequence, array or data-frame indicating which values are missing. T indicates a missing value, NIL means the value is present. Here’s an example of using missingp on a vector:

(missingp #(1 2 3 4 5 6 :na 8 9 10))
;#(NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL T NIL NIL NIL)

and on a data-frame:

 (print-data (missingp aq))

;;     X3  OZONE SOLAR-R WIND TEMP MONTH DAY
;;   0 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   1 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   2 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   3 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   4 NIL     T       T NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   5 NIL   NIL       T NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   6 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   7 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   8 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;   9 NIL     T     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  10 NIL   NIL       T NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  11 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  12 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  13 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  14 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  15 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  16 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  17 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  18 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  19 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  20 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  21 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  22 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL
;;  23 NIL   NIL     NIL NIL  NIL  NIL   NIL ..

We can see that the ozone variable contains some missing values. To see which rows of ozone are missing, we can use the which function:

(which aq:ozone :predicate #'missingp)
;#(4 9 24 25 26 31 32 33 34 35 36 38 41 42 44 45 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 64 71 74 82 83 101 102 106 114 118 149)

and to get a count, use the length function on this vector:

(length *) ; => 37

It’s often convenient to use the summary function to get an overview of missing values. We can do this because the missingp function is a transformation of a data-frame that yields another data-frame of boolean values:

LS-USER> (summary (missingp aq))
X4: 153 (100%) x NIL,
OZONE: 116 (76%) x NIL, 37 (24%) x T,
SOLAR-R: 146 (95%) x NIL, 7 (5%) x T,
WIND: 153 (100%) x NIL,
TEMP: 153 (100%) x NIL,
MONTH: 153 (100%) x NIL,
DAY: 153 (100%) x NIL,

we can see that ozone is missing 37 values, 24% of the total, and solar-r is missing 7 values.

Exclude

To exclude missing values from a single column, use the Common Lisp remove function:

(remove :na aq:ozone)
;#(41 36 12 18 28 23 19 8 7 16 11 14 18 14 34 6 30 11 1 11 4 32 ...

To ensure that our data-frame includes only complete observations, we exclude any row with a missing value. To do this use the drop-missing function:

(head (drop-missing aq))
;;   X3 OZONE SOLAR-R WIND TEMP MONTH DAY
;; 0  1    41     190  7.4   67     5   1
;; 1  2    36     118  8.0   72     5   2
;; 2  3    12     149 12.6   74     5   3
;; 3  4    18     313 11.5   62     5   4
;; 4  7    23     299  8.6   65     5   7
;; 5  8    19      99 13.8   59     5   8

Replace

To replace missing values we can use the transformation functions. For example we can recode the missing values in ozone by the mean. Let’s look at the first six rows of the air quality data-frame:

(head aq)
;;   X3 OZONE SOLAR-R WIND TEMP MONTH DAY
;; 0  1    41     190  7.4   67     5   1
;; 1  2    36     118  8.0   72     5   2
;; 2  3    12     149 12.6   74     5   3
;; 3  4    18     313 11.5   62     5   4
;; 4  5    NA      NA 14.3   56     5   5
;; 5  6    28      NA 14.9   66     5   6

Now replace ozone with the mean using the common lisp function nsubstitute:

(nsubstitute (mean (remove :na aq:ozone)) :na aq:ozone)

and look at head again:

(head aq)
;;   X3             OZONE SOLAR-R WIND TEMP MONTH DAY
;; 0  1           41.0000     190  7.4   67     5   1
;; 1  2           36.0000     118  8.0   72     5   2
;; 2  3           12.0000     149 12.6   74     5   3
;; 3  4           18.0000     313 11.5   62     5   4
;; 4  5           42.1293      NA 14.3   56     5   5
;; 5  6           28.0000      NA 14.9   66     5   6

You could have used the non-destructive substitute if you wanted to create a new data-frame and leave the original aq untouched.

Normally we’d round mean to be consistent from a type perspective, but did not here so you can see the values that were replaced.

Dates & Times

Lisp-Stat uses localtime to represent dates. This works well, but the system is a bit strict on input formats, and real-world data can be quite messy at times. For these cases chronicity and cl-date-time-parser can be helpful. Chronicity returns local-time timestamp objects, and is particularly easy to work with.

For example, if you have a variable with dates encoded like: ‘Jan 7 1995’, you can recode the column like we did for the vega movies data set:

(replace-column! imdb 'release-date #'(lambda (x)
				       (local-time:universal-to-timestamp
					(date-time-parser:parse-date-time x))))

3 - Distributions

Working with statistical distributions

Overview

The Distributions package provides a collection of probability distributions and related functions such as:

  • Sampling from distributions
  • Moments (e.g mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis), entropy, and other properties
  • Probability density/mass functions (pdf) and their logarithm (logpdf)
  • Moment-generating functions and characteristic functions
  • Maximum likelihood estimation
  • Distribution composition and derived distributions

Getting Started

Load the distributions system with (asdf:load-system :distributions) and generate a sequence of 1000 samples drawn from the standard normal distribution:

(defparameter *rn-samples*
              (nu:generate-sequence '(vector double-float)
			            			 1000
				                     #'distributions:draw-standard-normal))

and plot a histogram of the counts:

(plot:plot
   (vega:defplot normal
       `(:mark :bar
	     :data (:x ,*rn-samples*)
	     :encoding (:x (:bin (:step 0.5)
	                    :field x)
		            :y (:aggregate :count)))))

It looks like there’s an outlier at 5, but basically you can see it’s centered around 0.

To create a parameterised distribution, pass the parameters when you create the distribution object. In the following example we create a distribution with a mean of 2 and variance of 1 and plot it:

(defparameter rn2 (distributions:r-normal 2 1))
(let* ((seq (nu:generate-sequence '(vector double-float) 10000 (lambda () (distributions:draw rn2)))))
  (plot:plot
   (vega:defplot normal-2-1
       `(:mark :bar
	     :data (:x ,seq)
	     :encoding (:x (:bin (:step 0.5)
			            :field x)
		            :y (:aggregate :count))))))

Now that we have the distribution as an object, we can obtain pdf, cdf, mean and other parameters for it:

LS-USER> (mean rn2)
2.0d0
LS-USER> (pdf rn2 1.75)
0.38666811680284924d0
LS-USER> (cdf rn2 1.75)
0.4012936743170763d0

Gamma

In probability theory and statistics, the gamma distribution is a two-parameter family of continuous probability distributions. The exponential distribution, Erlang distribution, and chi-square distribution are special cases of the gamma distribution. There are two different parameterisations in common use:

  • With a shape parameter k and a scale parameter θ.
  • With a shape parameter α = k and an inverse scale parameter β = 1/θ, called a rate parameter.

In each of these forms, both parameters are positive real numbers.

The parameterisation with k and θ appears to be more common in econometrics and certain other applied fields, where for example the gamma distribution is frequently used to model waiting times.

The parameterisation with α and β is more common in Bayesian statistics, where the gamma distribution is used as a conjugate prior distribution for various types of inverse scale (rate) parameters, such as the λ of an exponential distribution or a Poisson distribution.

When the shape parameter has an integer value, the distribution is the Erlang distribution. Since this can be produced by ensuring that the shape parameter has an integer value > 0, the Erlang distribution is not separately implemented.

PDF

The probability density function parameterized by shape-scale is:

$f(x;k,\theta )={\frac {x^{k-1}e^{-x/\theta }}{\theta ^{k}\Gamma (k)}}\quad {\text{ for }}x>0{\text{ and }}k,\theta >0$,

and by shape-rate:

$f(x;\alpha ,\beta )={\frac {x^{\alpha -1}e^{-\beta x}\beta ^{\alpha }}{\Gamma (\alpha )}}\quad {\text{ for }}x>0\quad \alpha ,\beta >0$

CDF

The cumulative distribution function characterized by shape and scale (k and θ) is:

$F(x;k,\theta )=\int _{0}^{x}f(u;k,\theta ),du={\frac {\gamma \left(k,{\frac {x}{\theta }}\right)}{\Gamma (k)}}$

where $\gamma \left(k,{\frac {x}{\theta }}\right)$ is the lower-incomplete-gamma function.

Characterized by α and β (shape and rate):

$F(x;\alpha ,\beta )=\int _{0}^{x}f(u;\alpha ,\beta ),du={\frac {\gamma (\alpha ,\beta x)}{\Gamma (\alpha )}}$

where $\gamma (\alpha ,\beta x)$ is the lower incomplete gamma function.

Usage

Python and Boost use shape & scale for parameterization. Lisp-Stat and R use shape and rate for the default parameterisation. Both forms of parameterization are common. However, since Lisp-Stat’s implementation is based on Boost (because of the restrictive license of R), we perform the conversion $\theta=\frac{1}{\beta}$ internally.

Implementation notes

In the following table k is the shape parameter of the distribution, θ is its scale parameter, x is the random variate, p is the probability and q is (- 1 p). The implementation functions are in the special-functions system.

Function Implementation
PDF (/ (gamma-p-derivative k (/ x θ)) θ)
CDF (incomplete-gamma k (/ x θ))
CDF complement (upper-incomplete-gamma k (/ x θ))
quantile (* θ (inverse-incomplete-gamma k p))
quantile complement (* θ (upper-inverse-incomplete-gamma k p))
mean
variance 2
mode (* (1- k) θ), k>1
skewness (/ 2 (sqrt k))
kurtosis (+ 3 (/ 6 k))
kurtosis excess (/ 6 k)

Example

On average, a train arrives at a station once every 15 minutes (θ=15/60). What is the probability there are 10 trains (occurances of the event) within three hours?

In this example we have:

alpha = 10
theta = 15/60
x = 3

To compute the exact answer:

(distributions:cdf-gamma 3d0 10d0 :scale 15/60)
;=> 0.7576078383294877d0

As an alternative, we can run a simulation, where we draw from the parameterised distribution and then calculate the percentage of values that fall below our threshold, x = 3:

(let* ((rv  (distributions:r-gamma 10 60/15))
       (seq (aops:generate (distributions:generator rv) 10000)))
  (statistics-1:mean (e2<= seq 3))) ;e2<= is the vectorised <= operator
;=> 0.753199999999998d0

Finally, if we want to plot the probability:

(let* ((x    (aops:linspace 0.01d0 10 1000))
       (prob (map 'simple-double-float-vector
		          #'(lambda (x)
		              (distributions:cdf-gamma x 10d0 :scale 15/60))
		          x))
       (interval (map 'vector
		              #'(lambda (x) (if (<= x 3) "0 to 3" "other"))
		              x)))
  (plot:plot
   (vega:defplot gamma-example
       `(:mark :area
	     :data (:x ,x
		        :prob ,prob
		        :interval ,interval)
	      :encoding (:x (:field :x    :type :quantitative :title "Interval (x)")
		             :y (:field :prob :type :quantitative :title "Cum Probability")
		             :color (:field :interval))))))

References

Boost implementation of Gamma
Gamma distribution (Wikipedia)

4 - Select

Selecting Cartesian subsets of data

Overview

Select provides:

  1. An API for taking slices (elements selected by the Cartesian product of vectors of subscripts for each axis) of array-like objects. The most important function is select. Unless you want to define additional methods for select, this is pretty much all you need from this library. See the API reference for additional details.
  2. An extensible DSL for selecting a subset of valid subscripts. This is useful if, for example, you want to resolve column names in a data frame in your implementation of select.
  3. A set of utility functions for traversing selections in array-like objects.

It combines the functionality of dplyr’s slice and select methods.

Basic Usage

The most frequently used form is:

(select object selection1 selection2 ...)

where each selection specifies a set of subscripts along the corresponding axis. The selection specifications are found below.

To select a column, pass in t for the rows selection1, and the columns names (for a data frame) or column number (for an array) for selection2. For example, to select the first column of this array:

(select #2A((C0  C1  C2)
            (v10 v11 v12)
		    (v20 v21 v22)
		    (v30 v31 v32))
  t 1)
; #(C1 V11 V21 V31)

and to select a column from the mtcars data frame:

(ql:quickload :data-frame)
(data :mtcars)
(select mtcars t 'mpg)

if you’re selecting from a data frame, you can also use the column or columns command:

(column mtcars 'mpg)

to select an entire row, pass t for the column selector, and the row(s) you want for selection1. This example selects the first row (second row in purely array terms, which are 0 based):

(select #2A((C0  C1  C2)
            (v10 v11 v12)
		    (v20 v21 v22)
		    (v30 v31 v32))
  1 t)
;#(V10 V11 V12)

Selection Specifiers

Selecting Single Values

A non-negative integer selects the corresponding index, while a negative integer selects an index counting backwards from the last index. For example:

(select #(0 1 2 3) 1)                  ; => 1
(select #(0 1 2 3) -2)                 ; => 2

These are called singleton slices. Each singleton slice drops the dimension: vectors become atoms, matrices become vectors, etc.

Selecting Ranges

(range start end) selects subscripts i where start <= i < end. When end is nil, the last index is included (cf. subseq). Each boundary is resolved according to the other rules, if applicable, so you can use negative integers:

(select #(0 1 2 3) (range 1 3))         ; => #(1 2)
(select #(0 1 2 3) (range 1 -1))        ; => #(1 2)

Selecting All Subscripts

t selects all subscripts:

(select #2A((0 1 2)
	        (3 4 5))
	 t 1)                           ; => #(1 4)

Selecting w/ Sequences

Sequences can be used to make specific selections from the object. For example:

(select #(0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
	(vector (range 1 3) 6 (range -2 -1))) ; => #(1 2 3 6 8 9)

(select #(0 1 2) '(2 2 1 0 0))                ; => #(2 2 1 0 0)

Masks

Bit Vectors

Bit vectors can be used to select elements of arrays and sequences as well:

(select #(0 1 2 3 4) #*00110)          ; => #(2 3)

Which

which returns an index of the positions in SEQUENCE which satisfy PREDICATE.

(defparameter data
  #(12 127 28 42 39 113 42 18 44 118 44 37 113 124 37 48 127 36 29 31 125
   139 131 115 105 132 104 123 35 113 122 42 117 119 58 109 23 105 63 27
   44 105 99 41 128 121 116 125 32 61 37 127 29 113 121 58 114 126 53 114
   96 25 109 7 31 141 46 13 27 43 117 116 27 7 68 40 31 115 124 42 128 146
   52 71 118 117 38 27 106 33 117 116 111 40 119 47 105 57 122 109 124
   115 43 120 43 27 27 18 28 48 125 107 114 34 133 45 120 30 127 31 116))
(which data :predicate #'evenp)
; #(0 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 15 17 25 26 30 31 34 40 44 46 48 55 56 57 59 60 66 71 74
;  75 78 79 80 81 82 84 86 88 91 93 98 100 103 107 108 109 112 113 116 117 120)

Extensions

The previous section describes the core functionality. The semantics can be extended. The extensions in this section are provided by the library and prove useful in practice. Their implementation provide good examples of extending the library.

including is convenient if you want the selection to include the end of the range:

(select #(0 1 2 3) (including 1 2))
				    ; => #(1 2), cf. (select ... (range 1 3))

nodrop is useful if you do not want to drop dimensions:

(select #(0 1 2 3) (nodrop 2))
			; => #(2), cf. (select ... (range 2 3))

All of these are trivial to implement. If there is something you are missing, you can easily extend select. Pull request are welcome.

(ref) is a version of (select) that always returns a single element, so it can only be used with singleton slices.

Select Semantics

Arguments of select, except the first one, are meant to be resolved using canonical-representation, in the select-dev package. If you want to extend select, you should define methods for canonical-representation. See the source code for the best examples. Below is a simple example that extends the semantics with ordinal numbers.

(defmacro define-ordinal-selection (number)
  (check-type number (integer 0))
  `(defmethod select-dev:canonical-representation
       ((axis integer) (select (eql ',(intern (format nil \"~:@@(~:r~)\" number)))))
     (assert (< ,number axis))
     (select-dev:canonical-singleton ,number)))

(define-ordinal-selection 1)
(define-ordinal-selection 2)
(define-ordinal-selection 3)

(select #(0 1 2 3 4 5) (range 'first 'third)) ; => #(1 2)

Note the following:

  • The value returned by canonical-representation needs to be constructed using canonical-singleton, canonical-range, or canonical-sequence. You should not use the internal representation directly as it is subject to change.
  • You can assume that axis is an integer; this is the default. An object may define a more complex mapping (such as, for example, named rows & columns), but unless a method specialized to that is found, canonical-representation will just query its dimension (with axis-dimension) and try to find a method that works on integers.
  • You need to make sure that the subscript is valid, hence the assertion.

5 - SQLDF

Selecting subsets of data using SQL

Overview

sqldf is a library for querying data in a data-frame using SQL, optimised for memory consumption. Any query that can be done in SQL can also be done in the API, but since SQL is widely known, many developers find it more convenient to use.

To use SQL to query a data frame, the developer uses the sqldf function, using the data frame name (converted to SQL identifier format) in place of the table name. sqldf will automatically create an in-memory SQLite database, copy the contents of the data frame to it, perform the query, return the results as a new data frame and delete the database. We have tested this with data frames of 350K rows and there is no noticeable difference in performance compared to API based queries.

See the cl-sqlite documentation for additional functionality provided by the SQLite library. You can create databases, employ multiple persistent connections, use prepared statements, etc. with the underlying library. sqldf is a thin layer for moving data to/from data-frames.

Basic Usage

sqldf requires the sqlite shared library from the SQLite project. It may also be available via your operating systems package manager.

To load sqldf:

(asdf:load-system :sqldf)
(use-package 'sqldf) ;access to the symbols

Examples

These examples use the R data sets that are loaded using the example ls-init file. If your init file doesn’t do this, go now and load the example datasets in the REPL. Mostly these examples are intended to demonstrate commonly used queries for users who are new to SQL. If you already know SQL, you can skip this section.

Ordering & Limiting

This example shows how to limit the number of rows output by the query. It also illustrates changing the column name to meet SQL identifier requirements. In particular, the R CSV file has sepal.length for a column name, which is converted to sepal-length for the data frame, and we query it with sepal_length for SQL because ‘-’ is not a valid character in SQL identifers.

First, let’s see how big the iris data set is:

LS-USER> iris
#<DATA-FRAME (150 observations of 6 variables)>

and look at the first few rows:

(head iris)
;;   X7 SEPAL-LENGTH SEPAL-WIDTH PETAL-LENGTH PETAL-WIDTH SPECIES
;; 0  1          5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2 setosa
;; 1  2          4.9         3.0          1.4         0.2 setosa
;; 2  3          4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2 setosa
;; 3  4          4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2 setosa
;; 4  5          5.0         3.6          1.4         0.2 setosa
;; 5  6          5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4 setosa

X7 is the row name/number from the data set. Since it was not assigned a column name in the data set, lisp-stat gives it a random name upon import (X1, X2, X3, …).

Now use sqldf for a query:

(pprint
  (sqldf "select * from iris order by sepal_length desc limit 3"))

;;    X7 SEPAL-LENGTH SEPAL-WIDTH PETAL-LENGTH PETAL-WIDTH SPECIES
;; 0 132          7.9         3.8          6.4         2.0 virginica
;; 1 118          7.7         3.8          6.7         2.2 virginica
;; 2 119          7.7         2.6          6.9         2.3 virginica

Averaging & Grouping

Grouping is often useful during the exploratory phase of data analysis. Here’s how to do it with sqldf:

(pprint
  (sqldf "select species, avg(sepal_length) from iris group by species"))

;;   SPECIES    AVG(SEPAL-LENGTH)
;; 0 setosa                5.0060
;; 1 versicolor            5.9360
;; 2 virginica             6.5880

Nested Select

For each species, show the two rows with the largest sepal lengths:

(pprint
  (sqldf "select * from iris i
	      where x7 in
		  (select x7 from iris where species = i.species order by sepal_length desc limit 2) order by i.species, i.sepal_length desc"))

;;    X7 SEPAL-LENGTH SEPAL-WIDTH PETAL-LENGTH PETAL-WIDTH SPECIES
;; 0  15          5.8         4.0          1.2         0.2 setosa
;; 1  16          5.7         4.4          1.5         0.4 setosa
;; 2  51          7.0         3.2          4.7         1.4 versicolor
;; 3  53          6.9         3.1          4.9         1.5 versicolor
;; 4 132          7.9         3.8          6.4         2.0 virginica
;; 5 118          7.7         3.8          6.7         2.2 virginica

Recall the note above about X7 being the row id. This may be different depending on how many other data frames with an unnamed column have been imported in your Lisp-Stat session.

SQLite access

sqldf needs to read and write data frames to the data base, and these functions are exported for general use.

Write a data frame

create-df-table and write-table can be used to write a data frame to a database. Each take a connection to a database, which may be file or memory based, a table name and a data frame. Multiple data frames, with different table names, may be written to a single SQLite file this way. For example, to write iris to disk:

LS-USER> (defparameter *conn* (sqlite:connect #P"c:/Users/lisp-stat/data/iris.db3")) ;filel to save to
*CONN*

LS-USER> (sqldf::create-df-table *conn* 'iris iris) ; create the table * schema
NIL
LS-USER> (sqldf:write-table *conn* 'iris iris) ; write the data
NIL

Read a data frame

read-table will read a database table into a data frame and update the column names to be lisp like by converting “.” and “_” to “-”. Note that the CSV reading tools of SQLite (for example, DB-Browser for SQLite are much faster than the lisp libraries, sometimes 15x faster. This means that often the quickest way to load a data-frame from CSV data is to first read it into a SQLite database, and then load the database table into a data frame. In practice, SQLite also turns out to be a convenient file format for storing data frames.

Roadmap

SQLDF is currently written using an apparently abandoned library, cl-sqlite. Pull requests from 2012 have been made with no response from the author, and the SQLite C API has improved considerably in the 12 years since the cl-sqlite FFI was last updated.

We choose CL-SQLite because, at the time of writing, it was the only SQLite library with a commercially acceptable license. Since then CLSQL has migrated to a BSD license and is a better option for new development. Not only does it support CommonSQL, the de-facto SQL query syntax for Common Lisp, it also supports several additional databases.

Version 2 of SQLDF will use CLSQL, possibly including some of the CSV and other extensions available in SQLite. Benchmarks show that SQLite’s CSV import is about 15x faster than cl-csv, and a FFI wrapper of SQLite’s CSV importer would be a good addition to Lisp-Stat.

Joins

Joins on tables are not implemented in SQLDF, though there is no technical reason they could not be. This will be done as part of the CLSQL conversion and involves more advanced SQL parsing. SXQL is worth investigating as a SQL parser.